Chapter 40: Alterations of the Integument in Children My Nursing Test Banks

Huether and McCance: Understanding Pathophysiology, 5th Edition

Chapter 40: Alterations of the Integument in Children

Test Bank

MULTIPLE CHOICE

1. A 4-month-old male is brought to his primary care provider for severe itching and skin lesions. He is diagnosed with atopic dermatitis. Which of the following would be elevated in this patient?

a.

Immunoglobulin D (IgD)

b.

Immunoglobulin M (IgM)

c.

Immunoglobulin E (IgE)

d.

Immunoglobulin G (IgG)

ANS: C

Most individuals affected with atopic dermatitis show an increased serum IgE level.

Most individuals affected with atopic dermatitis show an increased serum IgE level, not IgD.

Most individuals affected with atopic dermatitis show an increased serum IgE level, not IgM.

Most individuals affected with atopic dermatitis show an increased serum IgE level, not IgG.

REF: p. 1071

2. A 4-month-old female is diagnosed with atopic dermatitis (AD). Which of the following assessment findings by the nurse will most likely support this diagnosis?

a.

Blistering

b.

Moist reddened skin

c.

Dry, itchy skin

d.

White patches

ANS: C

AD has a constellation of clinical features that include dry, sensitive, itchy, and easily irritated skin because the barrier function of the skin is impaired.

Dry skin, not blistering, occurs in AD.

Dry skin, not moist skin, occurs in AD.

White patches are characteristic of other disorders, such as measles.

REF: p. 1071

3. A 2-month-old female develops diaper dermatitis. A nurse will monitor this patient for which secondary infection that frequently accompanies diaper dermatitis?

a.

Streptococcus

b.

Proteus

c.

Candida albicans

d.

Staphylococcus aureus

ANS: C

Diaper dermatitis is secondarily infected with Candida albicans.

Diaper dermatitis is secondarily infected with Candida albicans, not Streptococcus.

Diaper dermatitis is secondarily infected with Candida albicans, not Proteus.

Diaper dermatitis is secondarily infected with Candida albicans, not Staphylococcus aureus.

REF: p. 1072

4. Acne vulgaris involves inflammation of the:

a.

Hair follicles

b.

Sebaceous follicles

c.

Eccrine glands

d.

Apocrine glands

ANS: B

Acne is a disorder of the pilosebaceous units, known as sebaceous follicles.

Acne is a disorder of the pilosebaceous units, known as sebaceous follicles, not hair follicles.

Acne is a disorder of the pilosebaceous units, known as sebaceous follicles, not eccrine glands.

Acne is a disorder of the pilosebaceous units, known as sebaceous follicles, not apocrine glands.

REF: p. 1070

5. A 14-year-old female presents with severe acne. Which of the following promotes acne development?

a.

Androgens

b.

Estrogens

c.

Gonadotropins

d.

Glucocorticoids

ANS: A

Androgens increase the size and productivity of the sebaceous glands and promote P. acnes.

Androgens, not estrogens, increase the size and productivity of the sebaceous glands and promote P. acnes.

Androgens, not gonadotropins, increase the size and productivity of the sebaceous glands and promote P. acnes.

Androgens, not glucocorticoids, increase the size and productivity of the sebaceous glands and promote P. acnes.

REF: p. 1071

6. Bullous impetigo is caused by a strain of:

a.

Staphylococcus aureus

b.

Molluscum contagiosum

c.

Escherichia coli

d.

Candida albicans

ANS: A

S. aureus is currently the most common overall cause of impetigo.

S. aureus, not molluscum contagiosum, is currently the most common overall cause of impetigo.

S. aureus, not E. coli, is currently the most common overall cause of impetigo.

S. aureus, not Candida albicans, is currently the most common overall cause of impetigo.

REF: p. 1072

7. A 10-year-old female from east Africa presents with vesicles consistent with vesicular impetigo. Which of the following is the most likely cause of her condition?

a.

Herpes virus

b.

Candida albicans

c.

Streptococcus pyogenes

d.

Human papillomavirus (HPV)

ANS: C

Vesicular impetigo is caused by Streptococcus pyogenes.

Vesicular impetigo is caused by Streptococcus pyogenes, not herpes.

Vesicular impetigo is caused by Streptococcus pyogenes, not Candida albicans.

Vesicular impetigo is caused by Streptococcus pyogenes, not HPV.

REF: p. 1073

8. A 3-year-old male develops tinea capitis after playing with the family dog. This infection is caused by a:

a.

Fungus

b.

Bacterium

c.

Virus

d.

Parasite

ANS: A

Tinea capitis is caused by a fungus.

Tinea capitis is caused by a fungus, not bacteria.

Tinea capitis is caused by a fungus, not a virus.

Tinea capitis is caused by a fungus, not a parasite.

REF: p. 1074

9. A 5-year-old male is diagnosed with tinea corporis following development of lesions on the non-hairy parts of his face, trunk, and limbs. A common source of this condition is a:

a.

Kitten

b.

Pet bird

c.

Hamster

d.

Horse

ANS: A

Tinea corporis is usually attributed to contact with young dogs and cats.

Tinea corporis is usually attributed to contact with young dogs and cats, not birds.

Tinea corporis is usually attributed to contact with young dogs and cats, not hamsters.

Tinea corporis is usually attributed to contact with young dogs and cats, not horses.

REF: p. 1074

10. The nurse would correctly identify the medical term for ringworm as:

a.

Impetigo

b.

Tinea corporis

c.

Thrush

d.

Psoriasis

ANS: B

Ringworm is also known as tinea corporis.

Ringworm is not impetigo.

Ringworm is not thrush.

Ringworm is not psoriasis.

REF: p. 1074

11. A 4-month-old female develops white spots and shallow ulcers in her mouth. Her pediatrician diagnoses her with thrush. This condition is caused by:

a.

Escherichia coli

b.

Streptococcal bacteria

c.

Candida albicans

d.

Staphylococcal bacteria

ANS: C

Thrush is caused by Candida albicans.

Thrush is caused by Candida albicans, not E coli.

Thrush is caused by Candida albicans, not strep.

Thrush is caused by Candida albicans, not staph.

REF: p. 1074

12. A 6-year-old male presents with slightly umbilicated, dome-shaped lesions on the skin of the trunk, face, and extremities. He is diagnosed with molluscum contagiosum caused by a highly contagious:

a.

Bacterium

b.

Virus

c.

Fungus

d.

Parasite

ANS: B

Molluscum contagiosum is caused by a virus.

Molluscum contagiosum is caused by a virus, not bacteria.

Molluscum contagiosum is caused by a virus, not a fungus.

Molluscum contagiosum is caused by a virus, not a parasite.

REF: p. 1074

13. Molluscum contagiosum affects the skin and:

a.

Nails

b.

Tongue

c.

Conjunctiva

d.

Hair follicles

ANS: C

Molluscum contagiosum affects the skin and conjunctiva.

Molluscum contagiosum affects the skin and conjunctiva, not the nails.

Molluscum contagiosum affects the skin and conjunctiva, not the tongue.

Molluscum contagiosum affects the skin and conjunctiva, not the hair.

REF: p. 1074

14. The nurse would be correct in identifying the duration of rubella as:

a.

12 hours

b.

1 to 3 days

c.

7 days

d.

12 to 15 days

ANS: B

Rubella has a duration of 1 to 3 days.

Rubella has a duration of 1 to 3 days, not 12 hours.

Rubella has a duration of 1 to 3 days, not 7 days.

Rubella has a duration of 1 to 3 days, not 12 to 15 days.

REF: p. 1075

15. Rubella, rubeola, and roseola are common communicable diseases caused by _____ infection.

a.

Viral

b.

Bacterial

c.

Yeast

d.

Fungal

ANS: A

Rubella, rubeola, and roseola are all caused by a virus.

Rubella, rubeola, and roseola are all caused by a virus, not bacteria.

Rubella, rubeola, and roseola are all caused by a virus, not yeast.

Rubella, rubeola, and roseola are all caused by a virus, not a fungus.

REF: pp. 1075-1076

16. A 5-year-old female develops chickenpox after exposure at her day care center. This disease is caused by:

a.

A pox virus

b.

A herpes virus

c.

An adenovirus

d.

HPV

ANS: B

Chickenpox is caused by a herpes virus.

Chickenpox is caused by a herpes virus, not a pox virus.

Chickenpox is caused by a herpes virus, not adenovirus.

Chickenpox is caused by a herpes virus, not HPV.

REF: p. 1076

17. The pathophysiology student would correctly identify the etiologic agent of smallpox as:

a.

A bacteria

b.

A virus

c.

Insects

d.

Mites

ANS: B

The etiologic agent of smallpox is the pox virus.

The etiologic agent of smallpox is a virus, not bacteria.

The etiologic agent of small pox is a virus, not insects.

The etiologic agent of small pox is a virus, not mites.

REF: p. 1077

18. The nurse would expect the occurrence of scabies to occur more commonly among children who:

a.

Attend day care

b.

Live in crowded, unsanitary conditions

c.

Reside in rural areas

d.

Play outside

ANS: B

Scabies is often epidemic in areas of overcrowded housing and poor sanitation.

Scabies does occur in day care centers, but it occurs more commonly in unsanitary conditions.

Scabies occurs more commonly in areas of poor sanitation, not in rural areas.

Scabies can occur in children who play outside, but more commonly in areas of poor sanitation.

REF: p. 1077

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