Chapter 28 My Nursing Test Banks

 

Kneisl, Contemporary Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing, 3/e Test Bank
Chapter 28

Question 1

Type: MCSA

The student nurse asks if advance practice training is needed to lead psychoeducation groups and assist families. The instructor tells the nurse that all nurses can lead the groups as long as they:

1. Support a loss of autonomy.

2. Promote rigidity and chaos.

3. Understand family and group dynamics.

4. Isolate family members from one another.

Correct Answer: 3

Rationale 1: Nurses have long been involved in working with clients and their families in small groups brought together for health teaching, psychoeducation, or supportive purposes. All nurses, regardless of level of education, can lead therapeutic groups or psychoeducation groups, and all nurses can assist families, as long as they understand and apply group and family dynamics in their interventions.

Rationale 2: Nurses have long been involved in working with clients and their families in small groups brought together for health teaching, psychoeducation, or supportive purposes. All nurses, regardless of level of education, can lead therapeutic groups or psychoeducation groups, and all nurses can assist families, as long as they understand and apply group and family dynamics in their interventions.

Rationale 3: Nurses have long been involved in working with clients and their families in small groups brought together for health teaching, psychoeducation, or supportive purposes. All nurses, regardless of level of education, can lead therapeutic groups or psychoeducation groups, and all nurses can assist families, as long as they understand and apply group and family dynamics in their interventions.

Rationale 4: Nurses have long been involved in working with clients and their families in small groups brought together for health teaching, psychoeducation, or supportive purposes. All nurses, regardless of level of education, can lead therapeutic groups or psychoeducation groups, and all nurses can assist families, as long as they understand and apply group and family dynamics in their interventions.

Global Rationale:

Cognitive Level: Applying

Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity

Client Need Sub:

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Assessment

Learning Outcome: Apply the general principles of the Johari Window to create opportunities for change and learning in small groups.

Question 2

Type: MCSA

The nurse facilitating a group session is concerned that the members are hesitant about sharing feelings and experiences. The nurse knows that there is a low level of trust among the group members, which will also determine the level of:

1. Cohesion.

2. Family history.

3. Risk-taking.

4. Uniqueness.

Correct Answer: 3

Rationale 1: Trusting and being trusted are intimately linked to risk-taking. The level of trust among the members of a group determines the extent of risk-taking behavior in the group. The group member who makes a suggestion, discloses an attitude, feeling, experience, or perception, gives feedback, or confronts another member engages in trusting behavior and assumes the risks inherent in trusting. Cohesion is not necessarily linked to trust. Family history and uniqueness are not related to trust.

Rationale 2: Trusting and being trusted are intimately linked to risk-taking. The level of trust among the members of a group determines the extent of risk-taking behavior in the group. The group member who makes a suggestion, discloses an attitude, feeling, experience, or perception, gives feedback, or confronts another member engages in trusting behavior and assumes the risks inherent in trusting. Cohesion is not necessarily linked to trust. Family history and uniqueness are not related to trust.

Rationale 3: Trusting and being trusted are intimately linked to risk-taking. The level of trust among the members of a group determines the extent of risk-taking behavior in the group. The group member who makes a suggestion, discloses an attitude, feeling, experience, or perception, gives feedback, or confronts another member engages in trusting behavior and assumes the risks inherent in trusting. Cohesion is not necessarily linked to trust. Family history and uniqueness are not related to trust.

Rationale 4: Trusting and being trusted are intimately linked to risk-taking. The level of trust among the members of a group determines the extent of risk-taking behavior in the group. The group member who makes a suggestion, discloses an attitude, feeling, experience, or perception, gives feedback, or confronts another member engages in trusting behavior and assumes the risks inherent in trusting. Cohesion is not necessarily linked to trust. Family history and uniqueness are not related to trust.

Global Rationale:

Cognitive Level: Applying

Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity

Client Need Sub:

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Implementation

Learning Outcome: Apply the general principles of the Johari Window to create opportunities for change and learning in small groups.

Question 3

Type: MCSA

The nurse knows the Johari Window is a theoretical tool used to represent:

1. The id and the superego in relation to self-awareness.

2. Depression in family members.

3. A multidimensional model of self.

4. Self-disclosure in relation to others.

Correct Answer: 4

Rationale 1: There are many ways to think about self-awareness. Some theorists have used the image of multiple masks that people wear under a variety of circumstances. Others have written about the true self versus the false self or the good me, the bad me, and the real me. Common to all these concepts is the idea that self-awareness is a complex, multidimensional phenomenon, often contradictory and partly undiscovered. The Johari Awareness Model, often called simply the Johari Window, is a theoretical tool used to represent self-awareness and self-disclosure in relation to other people. Depression, a multidimensional model of self, and the id and superego are not parts of the Johari Window.

Rationale 2: There are many ways to think about self-awareness. Some theorists have used the image of multiple masks that people wear under a variety of circumstances. Others have written about the true self versus the false self or the good me, the bad me, and the real me. Common to all these concepts is the idea that self-awareness is a complex, multidimensional phenomenon, often contradictory and partly undiscovered. The Johari Awareness Model, often called simply the Johari Window, is a theoretical tool used to represent self-awareness and self-disclosure in relation to other people. Depression, a multidimensional model of self, and the id and superego are not parts of the Johari Window.

Rationale 3: There are many ways to think about self-awareness. Some theorists have used the image of multiple masks that people wear under a variety of circumstances. Others have written about the true self versus the false self or the good me, the bad me, and the real me. Common to all these concepts is the idea that self-awareness is a complex, multidimensional phenomenon, often contradictory and partly undiscovered. The Johari Awareness Model, often called simply the Johari Window, is a theoretical tool used to represent self-awareness and self-disclosure in relation to other people. Depression, a multidimensional model of self, and the id and superego are not parts of the Johari Window.

Rationale 4: There are many ways to think about self-awareness. Some theorists have used the image of multiple masks that people wear under a variety of circumstances. Others have written about the true self versus the false self or the good me, the bad me, and the real me. Common to all these concepts is the idea that self-awareness is a complex, multidimensional phenomenon, often contradictory and partly undiscovered. The Johari Awareness Model, often called simply the Johari Window, is a theoretical tool used to represent self-awareness and self-disclosure in relation to other people. Depression, a multidimensional model of self, and the id and superego are not parts of the Johari Window.

Global Rationale:

Cognitive Level: Applying

Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity

Client Need Sub:

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Assessment

Learning Outcome: Apply the general principles of the Johari Window to create opportunities for change and learning in small groups.

Question 4

Type: MCSA

The nurse mentions to a colleague that yesterdays therapy group was developing cohesion and understands that this is important for:

1. Flexibility.

2. Boundaries.

3. Goal attainment.

4. Communication.

Correct Answer: 3

Rationale 1: A group is cohesive when its members are attracted to it. An attractive group has explicit, mutual, and attainable group goals with clear paths to goal attainment. Flexibility, boundaries, and communication are not dependent on cohesion.

Rationale 2: A group is cohesive when its members are attracted to it. An attractive group has explicit, mutual, and attainable group goals with clear paths to goal attainment. Flexibility, boundaries, and communication are not dependent on cohesion.

Rationale 3: A group is cohesive when its members are attracted to it. An attractive group has explicit, mutual, and attainable group goals with clear paths to goal attainment. Flexibility, boundaries, and communication are not dependent on cohesion.

Rationale 4: A group is cohesive when its members are attracted to it. An attractive group has explicit, mutual, and attainable group goals with clear paths to goal attainment. Flexibility, boundaries, and communication are not dependent on cohesion.

Global Rationale:

Cognitive Level: Applying

Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity

Client Need Sub:

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Assessment

Learning Outcome: Apply the general principles of the Johari Window to create opportunities for change and learning in small groups.

Question 5

Type: MCSA

The nurse leading a group of inpatient clients observes a client trying to control the group by monopolizing the discussion. The nurse knows this will most likely decrease:

1. Therapeutic alliance.

2. Leader credibility.

3. Cohesion.

4. Power and influence.

Correct Answer: 3

Rationale 1: The unequal distribution of power affects both the task and the maintenance functions of a group. Members who believe they have little influence within the group are unlikely to feel committed to group goals and to the implementation of group decisions. Their dissatisfaction with the group decreases its attractiveness and reduces its cohesion.

Rationale 2: The unequal distribution of power affects both the task and the maintenance functions of a group. Members who believe they have little influence within the group are unlikely to feel committed to group goals and to the implementation of group decisions. Their dissatisfaction with the group decreases its attractiveness and reduces its cohesion.

Rationale 3: The unequal distribution of power affects both the task and the maintenance functions of a group. Members who believe they have little influence within the group are unlikely to feel committed to group goals and to the implementation of group decisions. Their dissatisfaction with the group decreases its attractiveness and reduces its cohesion.

Rationale 4: The unequal distribution of power affects both the task and the maintenance functions of a group. Members who believe they have little influence within the group are unlikely to feel committed to group goals and to the implementation of group decisions. Their dissatisfaction with the group decreases its attractiveness and reduces its cohesion.

Global Rationale:

Cognitive Level: Applying

Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity

Client Need Sub:

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Assessment

Learning Outcome: Encourage the assumption of appropriate task roles and maintenance roles among members of small groups.

Question 6

Type: MCSA

When planning sessions for a group of battered women, which stage of group development would it be most appropriate for the nurse to lead a discussion regarding legal solutions and alternative living arrangements?

1. Forming

2. Norming

3. Storming

4. Performing

Correct Answer: 4

Rationale 1: During the performing stage, members increase their focus on the task at hand. There is an open exchange of information and the giving and receiving of feedback. In the forming stage, members are reluctant to self-disclose until issues of confidentiality are understood. In the storming phase, communication is more open and authentic, but conflicts that erupt may cause reticence among members to disclose personal feelings. In the norming phase, relationships among members are more open and trusting and cooperation among the members has increased but the rules and expectations are still being negotiated.

Rationale 2: During the performing stage, members increase their focus on the task at hand. There is an open exchange of information and the giving and receiving of feedback. In the forming stage, members are reluctant to self-disclose until issues of confidentiality are understood. In the storming phase, communication is more open and authentic, but conflicts that erupt may cause reticence among members to disclose personal feelings. In the norming phase, relationships among members are more open and trusting and cooperation among the members has increased but the rules and expectations are still being negotiated.

Rationale 3: During the performing stage, members increase their focus on the task at hand. There is an open exchange of information and the giving and receiving of feedback. In the forming stage, members are reluctant to self-disclose until issues of confidentiality are understood. In the storming phase, communication is more open and authentic, but conflicts that erupt may cause reticence among members to disclose personal feelings. In the norming phase, relationships among members are more open and trusting and cooperation among the members has increased but the rules and expectations are still being negotiated.

Rationale 4: During the performing stage, members increase their focus on the task at hand. There is an open exchange of information and the giving and receiving of feedback. In the forming stage, members are reluctant to self-disclose until issues of confidentiality are understood. In the storming phase, communication is more open and authentic, but conflicts that erupt may cause reticence among members to disclose personal feelings. In the norming phase, relationships among members are more open and trusting and cooperation among the members has increased but the rules and expectations are still being negotiated.

Global Rationale:

Cognitive Level: Applying

Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity

Client Need Sub:

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Planning

Learning Outcome: Encourage the assumption of appropriate task roles and maintenance roles among members of small groups.

Question 7

Type: MCSA

An inpatient group has decided to focus on developing better communication skills. Each member will practice initiating a conversation with a partner while a third member observes the interaction and provide feedback. Which stage of group development best describes these actions?

1. Performing

2. Forming

3. Norming

4. Storming

Correct Answer: 3

Rationale 1: During the norming stage, the group settles on specific ruleshow discussions take place, how decisions will be made, how the labor in the group is to be divided, and how goals, roles, and expectations are negotiated.

Rationale 2: During the norming stage, the group settles on specific ruleshow discussions take place, how decisions will be made, how the labor in the group is to be divided, and how goals, roles, and expectations are negotiated.

Rationale 3: During the norming stage, the group settles on specific ruleshow discussions take place, how decisions will be made, how the labor in the group is to be divided, and how goals, roles, and expectations are negotiated.

Rationale 4: During the norming stage, the group settles on specific ruleshow discussions take place, how decisions will be made, how the labor in the group is to be divided, and how goals, roles, and expectations are negotiated.

Global Rationale:

Cognitive Level: Applying

Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity

Client Need Sub:

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Assessment

Learning Outcome: Encourage the assumption of appropriate task roles and maintenance roles among members of small groups.

Question 8

Type: MCSA

The nurse notices that one of the group members seems frustrated. He is very friendly with everyone in the group but seems upset when some group members do not reciprocate with an equal amount of friendliness. The nurse understands that the group member is demonstrating his interpersonal needs for:

1. Love

2. Affection

3. Grief

4. Reasoning

Correct Answer: 2

Rationale 1: The affection need consists of being able to love other people or to be close and intimate to a satisfactory degree, and having others love you or be close and intimate with you to a satisfactory degree. Love is a component of the need for affection. Grief and reasoning do not apply to the scenario.

Rationale 2: The affection need consists of being able to love other people or to be close and intimate to a satisfactory degree, and having others love you or be close and intimate with you to a satisfactory degree. Love is a component of the need for affection. Grief and reasoning do not apply to the scenario.

Rationale 3: The affection need consists of being able to love other people or to be close and intimate to a satisfactory degree, and having others love you or be close and intimate with you to a satisfactory degree. Love is a component of the need for affection. Grief and reasoning do not apply to the scenario.

Rationale 4: The affection need consists of being able to love other people or to be close and intimate to a satisfactory degree, and having others love you or be close and intimate with you to a satisfactory degree. Love is a component of the need for affection. Grief and reasoning do not apply to the scenario.

Global Rationale:

Cognitive Level: Applying

Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity

Client Need Sub:

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Assessment

Learning Outcome: Improve the dynamics of small groups by incorporating an understanding of the interpersonal needs of inclusion, affection, and control.

Question 9

Type: MCSA

The nursing student knows that clients need for inclusion allows the group members to:

1. Remain emotionally available.

2. Become great communicators.

3. Interact with one another satisfactorily.

4. Use the clients need to obtain group privacy.

Correct Answer: 3

Rationale 1: The interpersonal need for inclusion is the need to establish and maintain relationships with others that offer interactions and associations satisfying to the individual. This need determines whether a person is outgoing or prefers privacy but does not relate to obtaining group privacy. The need for inclusion does not require a person to remain emotionally available or be a great communicator.

Rationale 2: The interpersonal need for inclusion is the need to establish and maintain relationships with others that offer interactions and associations satisfying to the individual. This need determines whether a person is outgoing or prefers privacy but does not relate to obtaining group privacy. The need for inclusion does not require a person to remain emotionally available or be a great communicator.

Rationale 3: The interpersonal need for inclusion is the need to establish and maintain relationships with others that offer interactions and associations satisfying to the individual. This need determines whether a person is outgoing or prefers privacy but does not relate to obtaining group privacy. The need for inclusion does not require a person to remain emotionally available or be a great communicator.

Rationale 4: The interpersonal need for inclusion is the need to establish and maintain relationships with others that offer interactions and associations satisfying to the individual. This need determines whether a person is outgoing or prefers privacy but does not relate to obtaining group privacy. The need for inclusion does not require a person to remain emotionally available or be a great communicator.

Global Rationale:

Cognitive Level: Applying

Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity

Client Need Sub:

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Assessment

Learning Outcome: Improve the dynamics of small groups by incorporating an understanding of the interpersonal needs of inclusion, affection, and control.

Question 10

Type: MCSA

A group leader states that he respects the competence and responsibility of members of the group but gets annoyed when one of the group members takes over a group meeting. The group leader is demonstrating the interpersonal need for:

1. Self-respect.

2. Religion.

3. Control.

4. Social reasoning.

Correct Answer: 3

Rationale 1: The interpersonal need for control is the need to establish and maintain a satisfactory relationship between oneself and other people with regard to power and influence and maintain a feeling of respect for the competence and responsibility of others to a satisfying degree to oneself. The group leader has a desire to control the group, but does not want to be controlled by any of its members. Religion, self-respect, and social reasoning are not among the three basic interpersonal needs.

Rationale 2: The interpersonal need for control is the need to establish and maintain a satisfactory relationship between oneself and other people with regard to power and influence and maintain a feeling of respect for the competence and responsibility of others to a satisfying degree to oneself. The group leader has a desire to control the group, but does not want to be controlled by any of its members. Religion, self-respect, and social reasoning are not among the three basic interpersonal needs.

Rationale 3: The interpersonal need for control is the need to establish and maintain a satisfactory relationship between oneself and other people with regard to power and influence and maintain a feeling of respect for the competence and responsibility of others to a satisfying degree to oneself. The group leader has a desire to control the group, but does not want to be controlled by any of its members. Religion, self-respect, and social reasoning are not among the three basic interpersonal needs.

Rationale 4: The interpersonal need for control is the need to establish and maintain a satisfactory relationship between oneself and other people with regard to power and influence and maintain a feeling of respect for the competence and responsibility of others to a satisfying degree to oneself. The group leader has a desire to control the group, but does not want to be controlled by any of its members. Religion, self-respect, and social reasoning are not among the three basic interpersonal needs.

Global Rationale:

Cognitive Level: Analyzing

Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity

Client Need Sub:

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Assessment

Learning Outcome: Improve the dynamics of small groups by incorporating an understanding of the interpersonal needs of inclusion, affection, and control.

Question 11

Type: MCSA

The nurse knows that any group moves through three interpersonal phases in a particular order, which includes:

1. Inclusion, control, and affection.

2. Reasoning, inclusion, and self-confidence.

3. Control, love, and affection.

4. Reasoning, self-confidence, and religion.

Correct Answer: 1

Rationale 1: Any group, given enough time, moves through three interpersonal phasesinclusion, control, and affection, in that orderthat correspond to the three basic interpersonal needs. Love, reasoning, self-confidence, and religion are not interpersonal phases.

Rationale 2: Any group, given enough time, moves through three interpersonal phasesinclusion, control, and affection, in that orderthat correspond to the three basic interpersonal needs. Love, reasoning, self-confidence, and religion are not interpersonal phases.

Rationale 3: Any group, given enough time, moves through three interpersonal phasesinclusion, control, and affection, in that orderthat correspond to the three basic interpersonal needs. Love, reasoning, self-confidence, and religion are not interpersonal phases.

Rationale 4: Any group, given enough time, moves through three interpersonal phasesinclusion, control, and affection, in that orderthat correspond to the three basic interpersonal needs. Love, reasoning, self-confidence, and religion are not interpersonal phases.

Global Rationale:

Cognitive Level: Applying

Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity

Client Need Sub:

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Assessment

Learning Outcome: Improve the dynamics of small groups by incorporating an understanding of the interpersonal needs of inclusion, affection, and control.

Question 12

Type: MCSA

A nursing student learns that group therapy reveals distortions in interpersonal relationships in an effort to:

1. Learn how to stifle emotions.

2. Examine and resolve issues.

3. Process and examine emotions.

4. Effectively handle emotions.

Correct Answer: 2

Rationale 1: Group therapy provides stimuli from multiple sources, revealing distortions in interpersonal relationships so that they can be examined and resolved. The goal of group therapy is not to stifle emotions. A result of examining and resolving issues may be to effectively process and handle emotions.

Rationale 2: Group therapy provides stimuli from multiple sources, revealing distortions in interpersonal relationships so that they can be examined and resolved. The goal of group therapy is not to stifle emotions. A result of examining and resolving issues may be to effectively process and handle emotions.

Rationale 3: Group therapy provides stimuli from multiple sources, revealing distortions in interpersonal relationships so that they can be examined and resolved. The goal of group therapy is not to stifle emotions. A result of examining and resolving issues may be to effectively process and handle emotions.

Rationale 4: Group therapy provides stimuli from multiple sources, revealing distortions in interpersonal relationships so that they can be examined and resolved. The goal of group therapy is not to stifle emotions. A result of examining and resolving issues may be to effectively process and handle emotions.

Global Rationale:

Cognitive Level: Applying

Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity

Client Need Sub:

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Assessment

Learning Outcome: Explain the purposes that therapeutic groups fulfill.

Question 13

Type: MCSA

A nurse has been working one-to-one therapy with a client but now tells the client it would be beneficial for the client to be part of a group. The nurse knows that the advantage of group therapy is:

1. A therapeutic experience for the benefit of many therapists.

2. The nurse can work with more people at one time.

3. Multiple associations with various therapists.

4. The presence of many people participating in a therapeutic experience.

Correct Answer: 4

Rationale 1: The advantages of group therapy stem from one major factor: the presence of many people, rather than a solitary therapist, who participate in the therapeutic experience. Group therapy is not for the benefit of the therapist. While the nurse can work with more people in a group setting and, over time, the client may work with various therapists, these are not the most advantageous aspects of group therapy.

Rationale 2: The advantages of group therapy stem from one major factor: the presence of many people, rather than a solitary therapist, who participate in the therapeutic experience. Group therapy is not for the benefit of the therapist. While the nurse can work with more people in a group setting and, over time, the client may work with various therapists, these are not the most advantageous aspects of group therapy.

Rationale 3: The advantages of group therapy stem from one major factor: the presence of many people, rather than a solitary therapist, who participate in the therapeutic experience. Group therapy is not for the benefit of the therapist. While the nurse can work with more people in a group setting and, over time, the client may work with various therapists, these are not the most advantageous aspects of group therapy.

Rationale 4: The advantages of group therapy stem from one major factor: the presence of many people, rather than a solitary therapist, who participate in the therapeutic experience. Group therapy is not for the benefit of the therapist. While the nurse can work with more people in a group setting and, over time, the client may work with various therapists, these are not the most advantageous aspects of group therapy.

Global Rationale:

Cognitive Level: Applying

Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity

Client Need Sub:

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Assessment

Learning Outcome: Explain the purposes that therapeutic groups fulfill.

Question 14

Type: MCSA

The client is being discharged from an inpatient facility. The nurse explains that part of the outpatient treatment will be to take part in group therapy because it provides a structure for:

1. Supporting clients on a regular basis.

2. Trying out old and new ways of acting and reacting.

3. Using health care benefits in new and exciting ways.

4. Supporting clients and families.

Correct Answer: 2

Rationale 1: Group therapy provides an interpersonal testing ground that allows members to try out old and new ways of being in an environment specifically structured for that purpose. Group therapy may, indeed, provide support for clients and families on a regular basis, but the emphasis is to provide a structured environment for the client to experiment with new behaviors. Using health care benefits is not a reason to participate in group therapy.

Rationale 2: Group therapy provides an interpersonal testing ground that allows members to try out old and new ways of being in an environment specifically structured for that purpose. Group therapy may, indeed, provide support for clients and families on a regular basis, but the emphasis is to provide a structured environment for the client to experiment with new behaviors. Using health care benefits is not a reason to participate in group therapy.

Rationale 3: Group therapy provides an interpersonal testing ground that allows members to try out old and new ways of being in an environment specifically structured for that purpose. Group therapy may, indeed, provide support for clients and families on a regular basis, but the emphasis is to provide a structured environment for the client to experiment with new behaviors. Using health care benefits is not a reason to participate in group therapy.

Rationale 4: Group therapy provides an interpersonal testing ground that allows members to try out old and new ways of being in an environment specifically structured for that purpose. Group therapy may, indeed, provide support for clients and families on a regular basis, but the emphasis is to provide a structured environment for the client to experiment with new behaviors. Using health care benefits is not a reason to participate in group therapy.

Global Rationale:

Cognitive Level: Applying

Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity

Client Need Sub:

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Assessment

Learning Outcome: Explain the purposes that therapeutic groups fulfill.

Question 15

Type: MCSA

Clients with mental disorders benefit from therapeutic groups because they provide:

1. Feedback from a number of sources.

2. A monitoring system that helps clients control impulses.

3. The best stimuli for clients.

4. A way for them to feel normal.

Correct Answer: 1

Rationale 1: Due to the presence of many people, group therapy provides multiple sources of feedback. Group therapy may or may not provide the best stimuli, is not designed to help people feel normal, and is not a monitoring system.

Rationale 2: Due to the presence of many people, group therapy provides multiple sources of feedback. Group therapy may or may not provide the best stimuli, is not designed to help people feel normal, and is not a monitoring system.

Rationale 3: Due to the presence of many people, group therapy provides multiple sources of feedback. Group therapy may or may not provide the best stimuli, is not designed to help people feel normal, and is not a monitoring system.

Rationale 4: Due to the presence of many people, group therapy provides multiple sources of feedback. Group therapy may or may not provide the best stimuli, is not designed to help people feel normal, and is not a monitoring system.

Global Rationale:

Cognitive Level: Analyzing

Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity

Client Need Sub:

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Assessment

Learning Outcome: Explain the purposes that therapeutic groups fulfill.

Question 16

Type: MCSA

The nurse is planning a psychoeducation group for substance abusers and is conducting selection interviews. Which of the following individuals with substance abuse issues would not be an appropriate member?

1. A client who has attended AA meetings in the past

2. A client who has been court ordered to attend group therapy

3. A client who has recently been promoted to district manager

4. A client who is also being treated for a psychiatric illness

Correct Answer: 3

Rationale 1: Major life changes may prevent the clients full and continued participation in the group. The client who has been court ordered to attend group may be in denial but has an external motivation to attend group. Clients being treated for a psychiatric illness and who have attended AA meetings in the past have a history of group involvement and know what to expect from group therapy.

Rationale 2: Major life changes may prevent the clients full and continued participation in the group. The client who has been court ordered to attend group may be in denial but has an external motivation to attend group. Clients being treated for a psychiatric illness and who have attended AA meetings in the past have a history of group involvement and know what to expect from group therapy.

Rationale 3: Major life changes may prevent the clients full and continued participation in the group. The client who has been court ordered to attend group may be in denial but has an external motivation to attend group. Clients being treated for a psychiatric illness and who have attended AA meetings in the past have a history of group involvement and know what to expect from group therapy.

Rationale 4: Major life changes may prevent the clients full and continued participation in the group. The client who has been court ordered to attend group may be in denial but has an external motivation to attend group. Clients being treated for a psychiatric illness and who have attended AA meetings in the past have a history of group involvement and know what to expect from group therapy.

Global Rationale:

Cognitive Level: Analyzing

Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity

Client Need Sub:

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Planning

Learning Outcome: Design a therapeutic group based on the needs and personality characteristics of potential members.

Question 17

Type: MCSA

The nurse is planning a group to rehabilitate sex offenders in a forensic psychiatric hospital. Which of the following factors would most likely decrease the degree of trust and cohesion among the members?

1. One hour weekly sessions

2. Addition of new members

3. Confidentiality rights of victims

4. Member interaction outside the group

Correct Answer: 2

Rationale 1: Closed groups with a stable membership experience a higher degree of trust and cohesion. If new members or outsiders are allowed to attend, a new dynamic occurs and time is needed to rebuild trust. One hour weekly sessions would encourage trust and cohesion. There are no confidentiality rights of victims to consider. Member interaction outside the group cannot be avoided in a locked environment such as a prison or forensic psychiatric hospital and would most likely not be an issue in the development of trust and cohesion.

Rationale 2: Closed groups with a stable membership experience a higher degree of trust and cohesion. If new members or outsiders are allowed to attend, a new dynamic occurs and time is needed to rebuild trust. One hour weekly sessions would encourage trust and cohesion. There are no confidentiality rights of victims to consider. Member interaction outside the group cannot be avoided in a locked environment such as a prison or forensic psychiatric hospital and would most likely not be an issue in the development of trust and cohesion.

Rationale 3: Closed groups with a stable membership experience a higher degree of trust and cohesion. If new members or outsiders are allowed to attend, a new dynamic occurs and time is needed to rebuild trust. One hour weekly sessions would encourage trust and cohesion. There are no confidentiality rights of victims to consider. Member interaction outside the group cannot be avoided in a locked environment such as a prison or forensic psychiatric hospital and would most likely not be an issue in the development of trust and cohesion.

Rationale 4: Closed groups with a stable membership experience a higher degree of trust and cohesion. If new members or outsiders are allowed to attend, a new dynamic occurs and time is needed to rebuild trust. One hour weekly sessions would encourage trust and cohesion. There are no confidentiality rights of victims to consider. Member interaction outside the group cannot be avoided in a locked environment such as a prison or forensic psychiatric hospital and would most likely not be an issue in the development of trust and cohesion.

Global Rationale:

Cognitive Level: Analyzing

Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity

Client Need Sub:

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Planning

Learning Outcome: Design a therapeutic group based on the needs and personality characteristics of potential members.

Question 18

Type: MCSA

A few members of an outpatient group have begun meeting socially in a local restaurant for coffee and donuts before going to work each day. What should the group therapist leader do in this situation?

1. Discourage social meetings outside regular group sessions

2. Encourage all members to meet for coffee and donuts each morning

3. Join the members a few mornings a week

4. Suggest meeting for dinner once a week instead

Correct Answer: 1

Rationale 1: Members in outpatient groups are discouraged from having relationships with other members outside the meetings. Relationships outside of the group are likely to interfere with the group dynamics because of the formation of social coalitions or dyads.

Rationale 2: Members in outpatient groups are discouraged from having relationships with other members outside the meetings. Relationships outside of the group are likely to interfere with the group dynamics because of the formation of social coalitions or dyads.

Rationale 3: Members in outpatient groups are discouraged from having relationships with other members outside the meetings. Relationships outside of the group are likely to interfere with the group dynamics because of the formation of social coalitions or dyads.

Rationale 4: Members in outpatient groups are discouraged from having relationships with other members outside the meetings. Relationships outside of the group are likely to interfere with the group dynamics because of the formation of social coalitions or dyads.

Global Rationale:

Cognitive Level: Analyzing

Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity

Client Need Sub:

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Implementation

Learning Outcome: Design a therapeutic group based on the needs and personality characteristics of potential members.

Question 19

Type: MCSA

The nursing student knows that group interaction requires the therapist to focus attention on each members feelings toward other group members, the therapists, and the group to illuminate relationship implications of interpersonal transactions. This process is known as:

1. Interactional group therapy.

2. The here-and-now.

3. Process illumination.

4. Objective family burden.

Correct Answer: 2

Rationale 1: The core of interactional group therapy is the here-and-now. According to Yalom (2005), the here-and-now work of the interactional group therapist occurs on two levels: focusing attention on each members feelings toward other group members, the therapists, and the group and illuminating the process (the relationship implications of interpersonal transactions). Objective family burden refers to the impact on the family of a person with mental illness. The here-and-now is an aspect of interactional group therapy.

Rationale 2: The core of interactional group therapy is the here-and-now. According to Yalom (2005), the here-and-now work of the interactional group therapist occurs on two levels: focusing attention on each members feelings toward other group members, the therapists, and the group and illuminating the process (the relationship implications of interpersonal transactions). Objective family burden refers to the impact on the family of a person with mental illness. The here-and-now is an aspect of interactional group therapy.

Rationale 3: The core of interactional group therapy is the here-and-now. According to Yalom (2005), the here-and-now work of the interactional group therapist occurs on two levels: focusing attention on each members feelings toward other group members, the therapists, and the group and illuminating the process (the relationship implications of interpersonal transactions). Objective family burden refers to the impact on the family of a person with mental illness. The here-and-now is an aspect of interactional group therapy.

Rationale 4: The core of interactional group therapy is the here-and-now. According to Yalom (2005), the here-and-now work of the interactional group therapist occurs on two levels: focusing attention on each members feelings toward other group members, the therapists, and the group and illuminating the process (the relationship implications of interpersonal transactions). Objective family burden refers to the impact on the family of a person with mental illness. The here-and-now is an aspect of interactional group therapy.

Global Rationale:

Cognitive Level: Applying

Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity

Client Need Sub:

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Assessment

Learning Outcome: Apply the process of here-and-now activation to a therapeutic group.

Question 20

Type: MCSA

During a group session, a client becomes very angry at a comment by another member of the group. The therapist asks why the client became so angry. The group is using:

1. Events for emotional awareness.

2. Interpersonal conflict issues to resolve personal issues.

3. The self-reflective loop.

4. Fear.

Correct Answer: 3

Rationale 1: The self-reflective loop considers what happened and reflects back on why it happened. The self-reflective loop process may result in emotional awareness and resolution of personal issues. Fear is not a factor in the self-reflective loop.

Rationale 2: The self-reflective loop considers what happened and reflects back on why it happened. The self-reflective loop process may result in emotional awareness and resolution of personal issues. Fear is not a factor in the self-reflective loop.

Rationale 3: The self-reflective loop considers what happened and reflects back on why it happened. The self-reflective loop process may result in emotional awareness and resolution of personal issues. Fear is not a factor in the self-reflective loop.

Rationale 4: The self-reflective loop considers what happened and reflects back on why it happened. The self-reflective loop process may result in emotional awareness and resolution of personal issues. Fear is not a factor in the self-reflective loop.

Global Rationale:

Cognitive Level: Applying

Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity

Client Need Sub:

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Assessment

Learning Outcome: Apply the process of here-and-now activation to a therapeutic group.

Question 21

Type: MCSA

The nurse knows that the primary task of the interactional group therapist is to make sure events in the session take precedence over:

1. Outside events.

2. Illness prevention.

3. Family matters.

4. Individual therapy.

Correct Answer: 1

Rationale 1: A primary task of the therapist is to actively steer the group discourse toward events in the session (the here-and-now) over those that occur outside or have occurred outside (the there-and-then).The work of the interactional group is not intended to displace individual therapy, prevent illness, or place priority on outside family matters.

Rationale 2: A primary task of the therapist is to actively steer the group discourse toward events in the session (the here-and-now) over those that occur outside or have occurred outside (the there-and-then).The work of the interactional group is not intended to displace individual therapy, prevent illness, or place priority on outside family matters.

Rationale 3: A primary task of the therapist is to actively steer the group discourse toward events in the session (the here-and-now) over those that occur outside or have occurred outside (the there-and-then).The work of the interactional group is not intended to displace individual therapy, prevent illness, or place priority on outside family matters.

Rationale 4: A primary task of the therapist is to actively steer the group discourse toward events in the session (the here-and-now) over those that occur outside or have occurred outside (the there-and-then).The work of the interactional group is not intended to displace individual therapy, prevent illness, or place priority on outside family matters.

Global Rationale:

Cognitive Level: Applying

Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity

Client Need Sub:

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Assessment

Learning Outcome: Apply the process of here-and-now activation to a therapeutic group.

Question 22

Type: MCSA

The therapist for an interactive therapy group has noticed some behaviors among the members that need to be made overt. The therapist would be concerned about:

1. Expressing affection and sorrow.

2. Suggesting alternatives and denigrating each other.

3. Power struggles and attention-seeking.

4. Seeking social support and increasing conflict.

Correct Answer: 3

Rationale 1: Power struggles between members in therapy groups should be made overt. Seeking social support, suggesting alternatives, and expressing affection are usually appropriate activities in therapy groups. Increasing conflict and denigrating other group members is inappropriate behavior. Expressing sorrow may or may not be appropriate behavior.

Rationale 2: Power struggles between members in therapy groups should be made overt. Seeking social support, suggesting alternatives, and expressing affection are usually appropriate activities in therapy groups. Increasing conflict and denigrating other group members is inappropriate behavior. Expressing sorrow may or may not be appropriate behavior.

Rationale 3: Power struggles between members in therapy groups should be made overt. Seeking social support, suggesting alternatives, and expressing affection are usually appropriate activities in therapy groups. Increasing conflict and denigrating other group members is inappropriate behavior. Expressing sorrow may or may not be appropriate behavior.

Rationale 4: Power struggles between members in therapy groups should be made overt. Seeking social support, suggesting alternatives, and expressing affection are usually appropriate activities in therapy groups. Increasing conflict and denigrating other group members is inappropriate behavior. Expressing sorrow may or may not be appropriate behavior.

Global Rationale:

Cognitive Level: Applying

Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity

Client Need Sub:

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Assessment

Learning Outcome: Develop process commentary appropriate to the level and purposes of the group.

Question 23

Type: MCSA

During group therapy, a male client laughs inappropriately and rolls his eyes when another male client discusses his feelings about coming out as a homosexual. The group therapist asks the first client to explain his reaction to the rest of the group. This process is an example of:

1. Taboo behavior.

2. Clearing the air.

3. Hidden homosexuality.

4. Attention-seeking and power struggles.

Correct Answer: 2

Rationale 1: Clearing the air (making covert interpersonal difficulties overt) is an integral part of illuminating the process. The group must move beyond a focus on content toward a focus on processthe how and the why of an interaction. The members must recognize, examine, and understand the process and be willing to self-disclose to avoid future conflicts and detrimental behaviors.

Rationale 2: Clearing the air (making covert interpersonal difficulties overt) is an integral part of illuminating the process. The group must move beyond a focus on content toward a focus on processthe how and the why of an interaction. The members must recognize, examine, and understand the process and be willing to self-disclose to avoid future conflicts and detrimental behaviors.

Rationale 3: Clearing the air (making covert interpersonal difficulties overt) is an integral part of illuminating the process. The group must move beyond a focus on content toward a focus on processthe how and the why of an interaction. The members must recognize, examine, and understand the process and be willing to self-disclose to avoid future conflicts and detrimental behaviors.

Rationale 4: Clearing the air (making covert interpersonal difficulties overt) is an integral part of illuminating the process. The group must move beyond a focus on content toward a focus on processthe how and the why of an interaction. The members must recognize, examine, and understand the process and be willing to self-disclose to avoid future conflicts and detrimental behaviors.

Global Rationale:

Cognitive Level: Analyzing

Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity

Client Need Sub:

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Implementation

Learning Outcome: Develop process commentary appropriate to the level and purposes of the group.

Question 24

Type: MCSA

Which of the following group therapies would be most helpful for clients diagnosed with severe and persistent schizophrenia who are living in a nursing home?

1. Bible-study groups

2. Dialectical behavior groups

3. Mutual-help groups

4. Social skills training groups

Correct Answer: 4

Rationale 1: Older people with severe and persistent schizophrenia can learn and maintain new skills and report improved functioning after cognitive behavioral social skills training. Mutual help groups do not provide enough structure for schizophrenic clients. Bible study groups may increase religious delusions. Dialectical behavior groups require understanding of abstract concepts that may be too difficult for severe and persistent schizophrenic clients to grasp.

Rationale 2: Older people with severe and persistent schizophrenia can learn and maintain new skills and report improved functioning after cognitive behavioral social skills training. Mutual help groups do not provide enough structure for schizophrenic clients. Bible study groups may increase religious delusions. Dialectical behavior groups require understanding of abstract concepts that may be too difficult for severe and persistent schizophrenic clients to grasp.

Rationale 3: Older people with severe and persistent schizophrenia can learn and maintain new skills and report improved functioning after cognitive behavioral social skills training. Mutual help groups do not provide enough structure for schizophrenic clients. Bible study groups may increase religious delusions. Dialectical behavior groups require understanding of abstract concepts that may be too difficult for severe and persistent schizophrenic clients to grasp.

Rationale 4: Older people with severe and persistent schizophrenia can learn and maintain new skills and report improved functioning after cognitive behavioral social skills training. Mutual help groups do not provide enough structure for schizophrenic clients. Bible study groups may increase religious delusions. Dialectical behavior groups require understanding of abstract concepts that may be too difficult for severe and persistent schizophrenic clients to grasp.

Global Rationale:

Cognitive Level: Applying

Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity

Client Need Sub:

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Planning

Learning Outcome: Maintain a therapeutic group based on the needs of a specific population in inpatient or community settings.

Question 25

Type: MCSA

Clients with chronic persistent mental illness have been attending a creative activities group which focuses on expression of feelings through poetry, music, and art. What client behaviors would be expected?

1. Increased paranoid delusions

2. Increased physical activity

3. Increased auditory hallucinations

4. Increased social interaction and self-esteem

Correct Answer: 4

Rationale 1: Activity therapies are manual, recreational, and creative techniques to facilitate personal experiences and increase social responses and self-esteem.

Rationale 2: Activity therapies are manual, recreational, and creative techniques to facilitate personal experiences and increase social responses and self-esteem.

Rationale 3: Activity therapies are manual, recreational, and creative techniques to facilitate personal experiences and increase social responses and self-esteem.

Rationale 4: Activity therapies are manual, recreational, and creative techniques to facilitate personal experiences and increase social responses and self-esteem.

Global Rationale:

Cognitive Level: Applying

Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity

Client Need Sub:

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Evaluation

Learning Outcome: Maintain a therapeutic group based on the needs of a specific population in inpatient or community settings.

Question 26

Type: MCSA

You are a nurse manager of an ICU in a local hospital and have lost two nurses on your staff. One nurse quit and the other nurse is receiving treatment in a center for alcohol abuse. What type of group would you recommend to your staff before considering a transfer or quitting?

1. Nurse-to-nurse support group

2. Nurse storytelling group

3. Nurse bibliotherapy group

4. Nurse Alcoholics Anonymous group

Correct Answer: 1

Rationale 1: Nurses who work together may form discussion and counseling groups to help reduce their job-related stress and to help them deal with problems of interpersonal relationships in more satisfying ways. Nurses in various intensive care and other high-pressure settings identify with increasing frequency the need for group work services that the psychiatricmental health nurse can provide.

Rationale 2: Nurses who work together may form discussion and counseling groups to help reduce their job-related stress and to help them deal with problems of interpersonal relationships in more satisfying ways. Nurses in various intensive care and other high-pressure settings identify with increasing frequency the need for group work services that the psychiatricmental health nurse can provide.

Rationale 3: Nurses who work together may form discussion and counseling groups to help reduce their job-related stress and to help them deal with problems of interpersonal relationships in more satisfying ways. Nurses in various intensive care and other high-pressure settings identify with increasing frequency the need for group work services that the psychiatricmental health nurse can provide.

Rationale 4: Nurses who work together may form discussion and counseling groups to help reduce their job-related stress and to help them deal with problems of interpersonal relationships in more satisfying ways. Nurses in various intensive care and other high-pressure settings identify with increasing frequency the need for group work services that the psychiatricmental health nurse can provide.

Global Rationale:

Cognitive Level: Applying

Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity

Client Need Sub:

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Implementation

Learning Outcome: Maintain a therapeutic group based on the needs of a specific population in inpatient or community settings.

Kneisl, Contemporary Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing, 3/e Test Bank

Copyright 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.

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