Chapter 12 My Nursing Test Banks

Ball/Bindler/Cowen, Principles of Pediatric Nursing: Caring for Children 6th Edition Test Bank
Chapter 12

Question 1

Type: MCMA

The nurse in the long-termcare clinic is reviewing the charts of a group of children with chronic physical, psychological, functional, and/or social limitations. Which conditions are most likely to lead to chronic limitations?

Standard Text: Select all that apply.

1. Near drowning

2. Congenital heart defect

3. Sinusitis

4. Fetal insult when the mother contracted rubella in the first trimester of pregnancy

5. Sepsis contracted as a neonate

Correct Answer: 1,2,4,5

Rationale 1: All of these conditions or events except sinusitis can leave a child with a permanent chronic condition.

Rationale 2: All of these conditions or events except sinusitis can leave a child with a permanent chronic condition.

Rationale 3: All of these conditions or events except sinusitis can leave a child with a permanent chronic condition.

Rationale 4: All of these conditions or events except sinusitis can leave a child with a permanent chronic condition.

Rationale 5: All of these conditions or events except sinusitis can leave a child with a permanent chronic condition.

Global Rationale: All of these conditions or events except sinusitis can leave a child with a permanent chronic condition.

Cognitive Level: Analyzing

Client Need: Health Promotion and Maintenance

Client Need Sub: 

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Assessment

Learning Outcome: LO 12.1 Explain the causes of chronic conditions in children.

Question 2

Type: MCSA

The school nurse completes an assessment of a school-age client to determine the services this child will need in the classroom. The client is a newly diagnosed with type I diabetes mellitus. Based on this information, which special healthcare need category is the most appropriate?

1. Dependent on medication or special diet

2. Dependent on medical technology

3. Increase use of healthcare services

4. Functional limitations

Correct Answer: 1

Rationale 1: A child recently diagnosed with type I diabetes mellitus with no other medical diagnoses would be placed in the dependent on medication or special diet category. The other categories of care are not appropriate for this client.

Rationale 2: A child recently diagnosed with type I diabetes mellitus with no other medical diagnoses would be placed in the dependent on medication or special diet category. The other categories of care are not appropriate for this client.

Rationale 3: A child recently diagnosed with type I diabetes mellitus with no other medical diagnoses would be placed in the dependent on medication or special diet category. The other categories of care are not appropriate for this client.

Rationale 4: A child recently diagnosed with type I diabetes mellitus with no other medical diagnoses would be placed in the dependent on medication or special diet category. The other categories of care are not appropriate for this client.

Global Rationale: A child recently diagnosed with type I diabetes mellitus with no other medical diagnoses would be placed in the dependent on medication or special diet category. The other categories of care are not appropriate for this client.

Cognitive Level: Applying

Client Need: Physiological Integrity

Client Need Sub: 

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Planning

Learning Outcome: LO 12.2 Identify the categories of chronic conditions in children.

Question 3

Type: MCSA

The nurse can instruct parents to expect children in which age group to begin to assume more independent responsibility for their own management of a chronic condition, such as blood-glucose monitoring, insulin administration, intermittent self-catheterization, and appropriate inhaler use?

1. Toddlers

2. Preschoolers

3. School-age

4. Adolescents

Correct Answer: 3

Rationale 1: School-age children are developing a sense of industry and can begin assuming responsibility for self-care. Toddlers and preschoolers do not have the cognitive and psychomotor skills for these tasks. Adolescents should already be well accomplished at self-care.

Rationale 2: School-age children are developing a sense of industry and can begin assuming responsibility for self-care. Toddlers and preschoolers do not have the cognitive and psychomotor skills for these tasks. Adolescents should already be well accomplished at self-care.

Rationale 3: School-age children are developing a sense of industry and can begin assuming responsibility for self-care. Toddlers and preschoolers do not have the cognitive and psychomotor skills for these tasks. Adolescents should already be well accomplished at self-care.

Rationale 4: School-age children are developing a sense of industry and can begin assuming responsibility for self-care. Toddlers and preschoolers do not have the cognitive and psychomotor skills for these tasks. Adolescents should already be well accomplished at self-care.

Global Rationale: School-age children are developing a sense of industry and can begin assuming responsibility for self-care. Toddlers and preschoolers do not have the cognitive and psychomotor skills for these tasks. Adolescents should already be well accomplished at self-care.

Cognitive Level: Applying

Client Need: Health Promotion and Maintenance

Client Need Sub: 

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Implementation

Learning Outcome: LO 12.5 Prepare the family of a child with a chronic condition to effectively care for the child in the home.

Question 4

Type: MCSA

The nurse is working in an adolescent medical clinic. What can the nurse anticipate when comparing adolescents in the clinic with chronic conditions to their peers?

1. A high level self-esteem

2. A concern for their parents

3. An altered body image

4. A decreased concern about their appearance

Correct Answer: 3

Rationale 1: As adolescents develop a sense of identity, they are focused on themselves and the present. They have a heightened concern about their appearance but may have inaccurate assessments of their body image and low self-esteem when comparing their bodies with those of their peers.

Rationale 2: As adolescents develop a sense of identity, they are focused on themselves and the present. They have a heightened concern about their appearance but may have inaccurate assessments of their body image and low self-esteem when comparing their bodies with those of their peers.

Rationale 3: As adolescents develop a sense of identity, they are focused on themselves and the present. They have a heightened concern about their appearance but may have inaccurate assessments of their body image and low self-esteem when comparing their bodies with those of their peers.

Rationale 4: As adolescents develop a sense of identity, they are focused on themselves and the present. They have a heightened concern about their appearance but may have inaccurate assessments of their body image and low self-esteem when comparing their bodies with those of their peers.

Global Rationale: As adolescents develop a sense of identity, they are focused on themselves and the present. They have a heightened concern about their appearance but may have inaccurate assessments of their body image and low self-esteem when comparing their bodies with those of their peers.

Cognitive Level: Applying

Client Need: Health Promotion and Maintenance

Client Need Sub: 

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Assessment

Learning Outcome: LO 12.4 Assess the family of a child with a chronic condition.

Question 5

Type: MCSA

The nurse is working with a child with a chronic condition. The nurse observes that over time, the parents have experienced a pattern of periodic grieving alternating with denial. What are the parents currently experiencing based on this assessment finding?

1. Chronic sorrow

2. Compassion fatigue

3. Dysfunctional parenting

4. Pathological grieving

Correct Answer: 1

Rationale 1: Parents experience chronic sorrow as they grieve when their child does not meet developmental milestones or participate in activities of normal children. The time between periods of grieving may be times of parental denial, which allows the family to function. Compassion fatigue is experienced by caregivers as their ability to feel compassion is exhausted. Dysfunctional parenting involves inadequately meeting the needs of children. Pathological grieving results when persons do not move through the stages of grief to resolution.

Rationale 2: Parents experience chronic sorrow as they grieve when their child does not meet developmental milestones or participate in activities of normal children. The time between periods of grieving may be times of parental denial, which allows the family to function. Compassion fatigue is experienced by caregivers as their ability to feel compassion is exhausted. Dysfunctional parenting involves inadequately meeting the needs of children. Pathological grieving results when persons do not move through the stages of grief to resolution.

Rationale 3: Parents experience chronic sorrow as they grieve when their child does not meet developmental milestones or participate in activities of normal children. The time between periods of grieving may be times of parental denial, which allows the family to function. Compassion fatigue is experienced by caregivers as their ability to feel compassion is exhausted. Dysfunctional parenting involves inadequately meeting the needs of children. Pathological grieving results when persons do not move through the stages of grief to resolution.

Rationale 4: Parents experience chronic sorrow as they grieve when their child does not meet developmental milestones or participate in activities of normal children. The time between periods of grieving may be times of parental denial, which allows the family to function. Compassion fatigue is experienced by caregivers as their ability to feel compassion is exhausted. Dysfunctional parenting involves inadequately meeting the needs of children. Pathological grieving results when persons do not move through the stages of grief to resolution.

Global Rationale: Parents experience chronic sorrow as they grieve when their child does not meet developmental milestones or participate in activities of normal children. The time between periods of grieving may be times of parental denial, which allows the family to function. Compassion fatigue is experienced by caregivers as their ability to feel compassion is exhausted. Dysfunctional parenting involves inadequately meeting the needs of children. Pathological grieving results when persons do not move through the stages of grief to resolution.

Cognitive Level: Analyzing

Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity

Client Need Sub: 

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Diagnosis

Learning Outcome: LO 12.5 Prepare the family of a child with a chronic condition to effectively care for the child in the home.

Question 6

Type: MCMA

In working with parents of children with chronic diseases, the nurse is concerned with helping the parents to protect themselves from compassion fatigue. Which activities are appropriate for the nurse to encourage?

Standard Text: Select all that apply.

1. Sleeping more than 9 hours per 24-hour period

2. Exercising

3. Fostering social relationships

4. Developing a hobby

5. Moving away

Correct Answer: 2,3,4

Rationale 1: Exercising, fostering social relationships, and developing a hobby all contribute to physical, spiritual, social, and mental rest and restoration. Sleeping more than the body requires and moving away are avoidance behaviors that do not address exhaustion from overwhelming caregiving responsibilities.

Rationale 2: Exercising, fostering social relationships, and developing a hobby all contribute to physical, spiritual, social, and mental rest and restoration. Sleeping more than the body requires and moving away are avoidance behaviors that do not address exhaustion from overwhelming caregiving responsibilities.

Rationale 3: Exercising, fostering social relationships, and developing a hobby all contribute to physical, spiritual, social, and mental rest and restoration. Sleeping more than the body requires and moving away are avoidance behaviors that do not address exhaustion from overwhelming caregiving responsibilities.

Rationale 4: Exercising, fostering social relationships, and developing a hobby all contribute to physical, spiritual, social, and mental rest and restoration. Sleeping more than the body requires and moving away are avoidance behaviors that do not address exhaustion from overwhelming caregiving responsibilities.

Rationale 5: Exercising, fostering social relationships, and developing a hobby all contribute to physical, spiritual, social, and mental rest and restoration. Sleeping more than the body requires and moving away are avoidance behaviors that do not address exhaustion from overwhelming caregiving responsibilities.

Global Rationale: Exercising, fostering social relationships, and developing a hobby all contribute to physical, spiritual, social, and mental rest and restoration. Sleeping more than the body requires and moving away are avoidance behaviors that do not address exhaustion from overwhelming caregiving responsibilities.

Cognitive Level: Applying

Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity

Client Need Sub: 

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Implementation

Learning Outcome: LO 12.5 Prepare the family of a child with a chronic condition to effectively care for the child in the home.

Question 7

Type: MCSA

The nurse is working with a group of parents who have children with chronic conditions. Which statement by a parent would indicate a risk for a caregiver burden that could become overwhelming?

1. My mother moved in and helped us take our quadruplets home.

2. Our health insurance sent us a rejection letter for my childs brand-name medication, and we must fill out forms to get the generic.

3. I chose to quit my job to be home with my child, and my husband helps in the evening when he can.

4. I have to care for my child day and night, which leaves little time for me.

Correct Answer: 4

Rationale 1: No respite time from caregiving responsibilities may lead to overwhelming caregiver burden. The familys pitching in to help indicates family support. Substituting generic for brand-name medications will not result in caregiver burden. The mothers choosing to care for the child and receiving help from the husband indicates family support.

Rationale 2: No respite time from caregiving responsibilities may lead to overwhelming caregiver burden. The familys pitching in to help indicates family support. Substituting generic for brand-name medications will not result in caregiver burden. The mothers choosing to care for the child and receiving help from the husband indicates family support.

Rationale 3: No respite time from caregiving responsibilities may lead to overwhelming caregiver burden. The familys pitching in to help indicates family support. Substituting generic for brand-name medications will not result in caregiver burden. The mothers choosing to care for the child and receiving help from the husband indicates family support.

Rationale 4: No respite time from caregiving responsibilities may lead to overwhelming caregiver burden. The familys pitching in to help indicates family support. Substituting generic for brand-name medications will not result in caregiver burden. The mothers choosing to care for the child and receiving help from the husband indicates family support.

Global Rationale: No respite time from caregiving responsibilities may lead to overwhelming caregiver burden. The familys pitching in to help indicates family support. Substituting generic for brand-name medications will not result in caregiver burden. The mothers choosing to care for the child and receiving help from the husband indicates family support.

Cognitive Level: Applying

Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity

Client Need Sub: 

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Evaluation

Learning Outcome: LO 12.7 Discuss the familys role in care coordination.

Question 8

Type: MCSA

The clinic nurse is working with a child with multiple disabilities. The parents have asked the nurse to help them in meeting with the school board to develop an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) and an Individualized Health Plan (IHP). Which nursing intervention is most appropriate?

1. Providing a written list of the childs medical diagnoses for the IEP meeting.

2. Offering to wait with the child while the parents attend the IEP meeting.

3. Listening to the parents concerns and complaints about the school district.

4. Presenting verbally the childs cognitive, physical, and social skills to school officials at the IEP meeting.

Correct Answer: 4

Rationale 1: As an advocate for the child and a partner with the family, the nurse attends the IEP meeting and presents the childs functional skills to develop a comprehensive IEP. A list of medical diagnoses does not accurately inform school officials about the childs skills or needs. Waiting with the child and listening to parents concerns may be kind and empathetic but does not contribute to an action plan for the childs educational needs.

Rationale 2: As an advocate for the child and a partner with the family, the nurse attends the IEP meeting and presents the childs functional skills to develop a comprehensive IEP. A list of medical diagnoses does not accurately inform school officials about the childs skills or needs. Waiting with the child and listening to parents concerns may be kind and empathetic but does not contribute to an action plan for the childs educational needs.

Rationale 3: As an advocate for the child and a partner with the family, the nurse attends the IEP meeting and presents the childs functional skills to develop a comprehensive IEP. A list of medical diagnoses does not accurately inform school officials about the childs skills or needs. Waiting with the child and listening to parents concerns may be kind and empathetic but does not contribute to an action plan for the childs educational needs.

Rationale 4: As an advocate for the child and a partner with the family, the nurse attends the IEP meeting and presents the childs functional skills to develop a comprehensive IEP. A list of medical diagnoses does not accurately inform school officials about the childs skills or needs. Waiting with the child and listening to parents concerns may be kind and empathetic but does not contribute to an action plan for the childs educational needs.

Global Rationale: As an advocate for the child and a partner with the family, the nurse attends the IEP meeting and presents the childs functional skills to develop a comprehensive IEP. A list of medical diagnoses does not accurately inform school officials about the childs skills or needs. Waiting with the child and listening to parents concerns may be kind and empathetic but does not contribute to an action plan for the childs educational needs.

Cognitive Level: Applying

Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity

Client Need Sub: 

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Implementation

Learning Outcome: LO 12.6 Summarize nursing management for the child with a chronic condition to support transition to school and adult living.

Question 9

Type: MCSA

The nurse is planning activities for a toddler with a birth injury of a torn brachial plexus that resulted in muscle atrophy and weakness of his right arm. Which nursing intervention is most appropriate for this client?

1. Offering the toddler a choice of clothing

2. Asking the toddler if he would like to take his medicine

3. Dressing the toddler

4. Feeding the toddler

Correct Answer: 1

Rationale 1: Toddlers are developing autonomy, self-control, and independence. Offering toddlers a choice contributes to their sense of autonomy. However, taking medicine is not within the toddlers realm of choice. Dressing and feeding the toddler does not encourage independence and will eventually cause frustration for both parent and toddler. The toddler must learn how to do these activities despite the physical limitations of the right arm.

Rationale 2: Toddlers are developing autonomy, self-control, and independence. Offering toddlers a choice contributes to their sense of autonomy. However, taking medicine is not within the toddlers realm of choice. Dressing and feeding the toddler does not encourage independence and will eventually cause frustration for both parent and toddler. The toddler must learn how to do these activities despite the physical limitations of the right arm.

Rationale 3: Toddlers are developing autonomy, self-control, and independence. Offering toddlers a choice contributes to their sense of autonomy. However, taking medicine is not within the toddlers realm of choice. Dressing and feeding the toddler does not encourage independence and will eventually cause frustration for both parent and toddler. The toddler must learn how to do these activities despite the physical limitations of the right arm.

Rationale 4: Toddlers are developing autonomy, self-control, and independence. Offering toddlers a choice contributes to their sense of autonomy. However, taking medicine is not within the toddlers realm of choice. Dressing and feeding the toddler does not encourage independence and will eventually cause frustration for both parent and toddler. The toddler must learn how to do these activities despite the physical limitations of the right arm.

Global Rationale: Toddlers are developing autonomy, self-control, and independence. Offering toddlers a choice contributes to their sense of autonomy. However, taking medicine is not within the toddlers realm of choice. Dressing and feeding the toddler does not encourage independence and will eventually cause frustration for both parent and toddler. The toddler must learn how to do these activities despite the physical limitations of the right arm.

Cognitive Level: Applying

Client Need: Health Promotion and Maintenance

Client Need Sub: 

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Implementation

Learning Outcome: LO 12.4 Assess the family of a child with a chronic condition.

Question 10

Type: MCSA

The nurse has set up a group discussion for several families with chronically ill children. The nurse informs these parents that they may face which ethical issue?

1. Normalization

2. Withholding and refusal of treatment

3. Repeated hospital admissions

4. Lack of proper dietary needs

Correct Answer: 2

Rationale 1: Withholding and refusal of treatment is an ethical issue involving the life and quality of life of the child. Normalization is a family process of adaptation as family members cope with daily life with their child. Lack of dietary needs is not an ethical issue, nor is repeated hospital admissions.

Rationale 2: Withholding and refusal of treatment is an ethical issue involving the life and quality of life of the child. Normalization is a family process of adaptation as the family members cope with daily life with their child. Lack of dietary needs is not an ethical issue, nor is repeated hospital admissions.

Rationale 3: Withholding and refusal of treatment is an ethical issue involving the life and quality of life of the child. Normalization is a family process of adaptation as the family members cope with daily life with their child. Lack of dietary needs is not an ethical issue, nor is repeated hospital admissions.

Rationale 4: Withholding and refusal of treatment is an ethical issue involving the life and quality of life of the child. Normalization is a family process of adaptation as the family members cope with daily life with their child. Lack of dietary needs is not an ethical issue, nor is repeated hospital admissions.

Global Rationale: Withholding and refusal of treatment is an ethical issue involving the life and quality of life of the child. Normalization is a family process of adaptation as family members cope with daily life with their child. Lack of dietary needs is not an ethical issue, nor is repeated hospital admissions.

Cognitive Level: Applying

Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity

Client Need Sub: 

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Implementation

Learning Outcome: LO 12.5 Prepare the family of a child with a chronic condition to effectively care for the child in the home.

Question 11

Type: MCSA

At the conclusion of teaching parents about cerebral palsy, the nurse asks, What is your hope for your toddler with cerebral palsy? Which reply from a parent best indicates an understanding of a realistic achievement for the child?

1. I hope my child qualifies for the Winter Olympics like I did.

2. I hope my child just enjoys life.

3. I hope my child will attend our neighborhood school.

4. I hope my child is liked and accepted by other children.

Correct Answer: 3

Rationale 1: Expecting a child with cerebral palsy to do well in the local school is a realistic hope that the child can possibly achieve. A child with cerebral palsy does not have the gross motor skills to qualify for the Olympics; thus, this is unrealistic. A hope for the child to enjoy life is realistic, but is not an achievement for the child. A hope that the child is liked and accepted by other children is realistic, but this hope is also dependent on other children.

Rationale 2: Expecting a child with cerebral palsy to do well in the local school is a realistic hope that the child can possibly achieve. A child with cerebral palsy does not have the gross motor skills to qualify for the Olympics; thus, this is unrealistic. A hope for the child to enjoy life is realistic, but is not an achievement for the child. A hope that the child is liked and accepted by other children is realistic, but this hope is also dependent on other children.

Rationale 3: Expecting a child with cerebral palsy to do well in the local school is a realistic hope that the child can possibly achieve. A child with cerebral palsy does not have the gross motor skills to qualify for the Olympics; thus, this is unrealistic. A hope for the child to enjoy life is realistic, but is not an achievement for the child. A hope that the child is liked and accepted by other children is realistic, but this hope is also dependent on other children.

Rationale 4: Expecting a child with cerebral palsy to do well in the local school is a realistic hope that the child can possibly achieve. A child with cerebral palsy does not have the gross motor skills to qualify for the Olympics; thus, this is unrealistic. A hope for the child to enjoy life is realistic, but is not an achievement for the child. A hope that the child is liked and accepted by other children is realistic, but this hope is also dependent on other children.

Global Rationale: Expecting a child with cerebral palsy to do well in the local school is a realistic hope that the child can possibly achieve. A child with cerebral palsy does not have the gross motor skills to qualify for the Olympics; thus, this is unrealistic. A hope for the child to enjoy life is realistic, but is not an achievement for the child. A hope that the child is liked and accepted by other children is realistic, but this hope is also dependent on other children.

Cognitive Level: Applying

Client Need: Health Promotion and Maintenance

Client Need Sub: 

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Evaluation

Learning Outcome: LO 12.5 Prepare the family of a child with a chronic condition to effectively care for the child in the home.

Question 12

Type: MCSA

A family actively participates in school functions. One of the children is paraplegic and requires a wheelchair for mobility. Which process does the nurse determine the family is working on based on these assessment findings?

1. Stagnation

2. Normalization

3. Isolation

4. Interaction

Correct Answer: 2

Rationale 1: The family is normalizing life with the children through activities. The family is not staying at home because one member cannot walk; rather, the family is moving on to full participation in life. The family is interacting with others through the process of normalization.

Rationale 2: The family is normalizing life with the children through activities. The family is not staying at home because one member cannot walk; rather, the family is moving on to full participation in life. The family is interacting with others through the process of normalization.

Rationale 3: The family is normalizing life with the children through activities. The family is not staying at home because one member cannot walk; rather, the family is moving on to full participation in life. The family is interacting with others through the process of normalization.

Rationale 4: The family is normalizing life with the children through activities. The family is not staying at home because one member cannot walk; rather, the family is moving on to full participation in life. The family is interacting with others through the process of normalization.

Global Rationale: The family is normalizing life with the children through activities. The family is not staying at home because one member cannot walk; rather, the family is moving on to full participation in life. The family is interacting with others through the process of normalization.

Cognitive Level: Applying

Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity

Client Need Sub: 

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Evaluation

Learning Outcome: LO 12.7 Discuss the familys role in care coordination.

Question 13

Type: MCSA

A 5-year-old sibling of a 9-year-old child with cystic fibrosis tells the nurse, I wish I had a breathing disease, too. The nurse knows the parents strive to spend quality time with each child and with both children together. What is the sibling currently experiencing?

1. Jealousy

2. Isolation

3. Loneliness

4. Anger

Correct Answer: 1

Rationale 1: The child with cystic fibrosis has something the younger child does not have. Cystic fibrosis brings the affected child more attention from others. Even if parents strive to spend more time with siblings of ill children, the well child will be jealous because the situation can never be equal. The 5-year-old child does not understand the complications of the disease and only sees the 9-year-old child treated differently. Siblings of ill children may experience loneliness, isolation, or anger; but the childs comment does not support these feelings.

Rationale 2: The child with cystic fibrosis has something the younger child does not have. Cystic fibrosis brings the affected child more attention from others. Even if parents strive to spend more time with siblings of ill children, the well child will be jealous because the situation can never be equal. The 5-year-old child does not understand the complications of the disease and only sees the 9-year-old child treated differently. Siblings of ill children may experience loneliness, isolation, or anger; but the childs comment does not support these feelings.

Rationale 3: The child with cystic fibrosis has something the younger child does not have. Cystic fibrosis brings the affected child more attention from others. Even if parents strive to spend more time with siblings of ill children, the well child will be jealous because the situation can never be equal. The 5-year-old child does not understand the complications of the disease and only sees the 9-year-old child treated differently. Siblings of ill children may experience loneliness, isolation, or anger; but the childs comment does not support these feelings.

Rationale 4: The child with cystic fibrosis has something the younger child does not have. Cystic fibrosis brings the affected child more attention from others. Even if parents strive to spend more time with siblings of ill children, the well child will be jealous because the situation can never be equal. The 5-year-old child does not understand the complications of the disease and only sees the 9-year-old child treated differently. Siblings of ill children may experience loneliness, isolation, or anger; but the childs comment does not support these feelings.

Global Rationale: The child with cystic fibrosis has something the younger child does not have. Cystic fibrosis brings the affected child more attention from others. Even if parents strive to spend more time with siblings of ill children, the well child will be jealous because the situation can never be equal. The 5-year-old child does not understand the complications of the disease and only sees the 9-year-old child treated differently. Siblings of ill children may experience loneliness, isolation, or anger; but the childs comment does not support these feelings.

Cognitive Level: Applying

Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity

Client Need Sub: 

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Diagnosis

Learning Outcome: LO 12.5 Prepare the family of a child with a chronic condition to effectively care for the child in the home.

Question 14

Type: MCSA

There are many healthcare needs of children with chronic conditions. What nursing strategy would best help parents with continuity of care?

1. Include the family and older child in decision making.

2. Assist the family in gaining transportation to healthcare appointments.

3. Provide the family with resources such as social services.

4. Recognize and respect the cultural needs of the family.

Correct Answer: 1

Rationale 1: Continuity of care involves the family and childs participation in their health care. Access to transportation involves access to care, not continuity. Providing resources such as social services is related to comprehensiveness of care, not to continuity. Recognizing and respecting cultural needs are part of the degree to which healthcare services, not continuity of care, are provided.

Rationale 2: Continuity of care involves the family and childs participation in their health care. Access to transportation involves access to care, not continuity. Providing resources such as social services is related to comprehensiveness of care, not to continuity. Recognizing and respecting cultural needs are part of the degree to which healthcare services, not continuity of care, are provided.

Rationale 3: Continuity of care involves the family and childs participation in their health care. Access to transportation involves access to care, not continuity. Providing resources such as social services is related to comprehensiveness of care, not to continuity. Recognizing and respecting cultural needs are part of the degree to which healthcare services, not continuity of care, are provided.

Rationale 4: Continuity of care involves the family and childs participation in their health care. Access to transportation involves access to care, not continuity. Providing resources such as social services is related to comprehensiveness of care, not to continuity. Recognizing and respecting cultural needs are part of the degree to which healthcare services, not continuity of care, are provided.

Global Rationale: Continuity of care involves the family and childs participation in their health care. Access to transportation involves access to care, not continuity. Providing resources such as social services is related to comprehensiveness of care, not to continuity. Recognizing and respecting cultural needs are part of the degree to which healthcare services, not continuity of care, are provided.

Cognitive Level: Applying

Client Need: Health Promotion and Maintenance

Client Need Sub: 

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Implementation

Learning Outcome: LO 12.5 Prepare the family of a child with a chronic condition to effectively care for the child in the home.

Question 15

Type: MCMA

It is important that parents of adolescents with special needs transition care of the adolescent so they can learn to make good decisions on their own. Which items are considered transitional needs?

Standard Text: Select all that apply.

1. Attending school

2. Discussing sexual matters

3. Letting most friends know of the medical condition

4. Socialization beyond the family

5. To write his or her own individualized healthcare plan

Correct Answer: 1,2,4

Rationale 1: Transitional needs toward independence include attending school, discussion of sexual matters, and socialization beyond the family. The other areas are not transitional needs.

Rationale 2: Transitional needs toward independence include attending school, discussion of sexual matters, and socialization beyond the family. The other areas are not transitional needs.

Rationale 3: Transitional needs toward independence include attending school, discussion of sexual matters, and socialization beyond the family. The other areas are not transitional needs.

Rationale 4: Transitional needs toward independence include attending school, discussion of sexual matters, and socialization beyond the family. The other areas are not transitional needs.

Rationale 5: Transitional needs toward independence include attending school, discussion of sexual matters, and socialization beyond the family. The other areas are not transitional needs.

Global Rationale: Transitional needs toward independence include attending school, discussion of sexual matters, and socialization beyond the family. The other areas are not transitional needs.

Cognitive Level: Applying

Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity

Client Need Sub: 

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Planning

Learning Outcome: LO 12.6 Summarize nursing management for the child with a chronic condition to support transition to school and adult living.

Question 16

Type: MCMA

The nurse is planning care for a preschool-age client who has cerebral palsy (CP). Which interventions are appropriate for this client?

Standard Text: Select all that apply.

1. Providing heath supervision

2. Collaborating with physical therapy

3. Assisting with planning educational services

4. Prescribing medication for spasticity

5. Promoting growth and development

Correct Answer: 1,2,3,5

Rationale 1: Appropriate interventions for the nurse who is providing care to a client with a chronic condition include providing health supervision, collaborating with other specialties, assisting with planning educational services, an promoting growth and development. It is outside the scope of nursing practice to prescribe medication. The nurse could, however, administer prescribed medications if appropriate.

Rationale 2: Appropriate interventions for the nurse who is providing care to a client with a chronic condition include providing health supervision, collaborating with other specialties, assisting with planning educational services, an promoting growth and development. It is outside the scope of nursing practice to prescribe medication. The nurse could, however, administer prescribed medications if appropriate.

Rationale 3: Appropriate interventions for the nurse who is providing care to a client with a chronic condition include providing health supervision, collaborating with other specialties, assisting with planning educational services, an promoting growth and development. It is outside the scope of nursing practice to prescribe medication. The nurse could, however, administer prescribed medications if appropriate.

Rationale 4: Appropriate interventions for the nurse who is providing care to a client with a chronic condition include providing health supervision, collaborating with other specialties, assisting with planning educational services, an promoting growth and development. It is outside the scope of nursing practice to prescribe medication. The nurse could, however, administer prescribed medications if appropriate.

Rationale 5: Appropriate interventions for the nurse who is providing care to a client with a chronic condition include providing health supervision, collaborating with other specialties, assisting with planning educational services, an promoting growth and development. It is outside the scope of nursing practice to prescribe medication. The nurse could, however, administer prescribed medications if appropriate.

Global Rationale: Appropriate interventions for the nurse who is providing care to a client with a chronic condition include providing health supervision, collaborating with other specialties, assisting with planning educational services, an promoting growth and development. It is outside the scope of nursing practice to prescribe medication. The nurse could, however, administer prescribed medications if appropriate.

Cognitive Level: Applying

Client Need: Health Promotion and Maintenance

Client Need Sub: 

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Implementation

Learning Outcome: LO 12.3 Describe the nurses role in caring for a child with a chronic condition.

Ball/Bindler/Cowen, Principles of Pediatric Nursing 6th Ed. Test Bank

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