Chapter 11 My Nursing Test Banks

Ball/Bindler/Cowen, Principles of Pediatric Nursing: Caring for Children 6th Edition Test Bank
Chapter 11

Question 1

Type: MCSA

The parents of a critically injured child wish to stay in the room while the child is receiving emergency care. Which action by the nurse is the most appropriate?

1. Escort the parents to the waiting room and assure them that they can see their child soon.

2. Allow the parents to stay with the child.

3. Ask the physician if the parents can stay with the child.

4. Tell the parents that they do not need to stay with the child.

Correct Answer: 2

Rationale 1: Parents should be allowed to stay with their child if they wish to do so. This position is supported by the Emergency Nurses Association and is a key aspect of family-centered care.

Rationale 2: Parents should be allowed to stay with their child if they wish to do so. This position is supported by the Emergency Nurses Association and is a key aspect of family-centered care.

Rationale 3: Parents should be allowed to stay with their child if they wish to do so. This position is supported by the Emergency Nurses Association and is a key aspect of family-centered care.

Rationale 4: Parents should be allowed to stay with their child if they wish to do so. This position is supported by the Emergency Nurses Association and is a key aspect of family-centered care.

Global Rationale: Parents should be allowed to stay with their child if they wish to do so. This position is supported by the Emergency Nurses Association and is a key aspect of family-centered care.

Cognitive Level: Applying

Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity

Client Need Sub: 

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Implementation

Learning Outcome: LO 11.6 Integrate the concept of family presence during procedures and nursing strategies used to prepare the family.

Question 2

Type: MCSA

The charge nurse on a hospital unit is developing plans of care related to separation anxiety. The charge nurse recognizes that which hospitalized child at highest risk to experience separation anxiety when parents cannot stay?

1. 6-month-old

2. 18-month-old

3. 3-year-old

4. 4-year-old

Correct Answer: 2

Rationale 1: While all of these children can experience separation anxiety, the young toddler is at highest risk. Toddlers are the group most at risk for a stressful experience when hospitalized. Separation from parents increases this risk greatly.

Rationale 2: While all of these children can experience separation anxiety, the young toddler is at highest risk. Toddlers are the group most at risk for a stressful experience when hospitalized. Separation from parents increases this risk greatly.

Rationale 3: While all of these children can experience separation anxiety, the young toddler is at highest risk. Toddlers are the group most at risk for a stressful experience when hospitalized. Separation from parents increases this risk greatly.

Rationale 4: While all of these children can experience separation anxiety, the young toddler is at highest risk. Toddlers are the group most at risk for a stressful experience when hospitalized. Separation from parents increases this risk greatly.

Global Rationale: While all of these children can experience separation anxiety, the young toddler is at highest risk. Toddlers are the group most at risk for a stressful experience when hospitalized. Separation from parents increases this risk greatly.

Cognitive Level: Applying

Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity

Client Need Sub: 

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Diagnosis

Learning Outcome: LO 11.5 Identify nursing strategies to minimize the stressors related to hospitalization.

Question 3

Type: MCSA

A group of children on one hospital unit are all suffering separation anxiety. Which child is experiencing the despair stage of separation anxiety?

1. Does not cry if parents return and leave again

2. Screams and cries when parents leave

3. Appears to be happy and content with staff

4. Lies quietly in bed

Correct Answer: 4

Rationale 1: Children in the despair stage appear sad, depressed, or withdrawn. A child who is lying in bed might be exhibiting any of these. Screaming and crying are components of the protest stage. The young child who appears to be happy and content with everyone is in the denial stage, as is the child who does not cry if parents return and leave again.

Rationale 2: Children in the despair stage appear sad, depressed, or withdrawn. A child who is lying in bed might be exhibiting any of these. Screaming and crying are components of the protest stage. The young child who appears to be happy and content with everyone is in the denial stage, as is the child who does not cry if parents return and leave again.

Rationale 3: Children in the despair stage appear sad, depressed, or withdrawn. A child who is lying in bed might be exhibiting any of these. Screaming and crying are components of the protest stage. The young child who appears to be happy and content with everyone is in the denial stage, as is the child who does not cry if parents return and leave again.

Rationale 4: Children in the despair stage appear sad, depressed, or withdrawn. A child who is lying in bed might be exhibiting any of these. Screaming and crying are components of the protest stage. The young child who appears to be happy and content with everyone is in the denial stage, as is the child who does not cry if parents return and leave again.

Global Rationale: Children in the despair stage appear sad, depressed, or withdrawn. A child who is lying in bed might be exhibiting any of these. Screaming and crying are components of the protest stage. The young child who appears to be happy and content with everyone is in the denial stage, as is the child who does not cry if parents return and leave again.

Cognitive Level: Applying

Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity

Client Need Sub: 

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Assessment

Learning Outcome: LO 11.2 Explain the effect of hospitalization on the child and family.

Question 4

Type: MCSA

A preschool-age client is seen in the clinic for a sore throat. In this childs mind, what is the most likely causative agent for the sore throat?

1. Was exposed to someone else with a sore throat.

2. Did not eat the right foods.

3. Yelled at his brother.

4. Did not take his vitamins.

Correct Answer: 3

Rationale 1: Preschoolers understand some concepts of being sick but not the cause of illness. They are likely to think that they are sick as a result of something that they have done. They will frequently view illness as punishment. A child of this age does not yet understand that he can become sick from exposure to someone else who is sick. The other two answers, while not causes of sore throat, can be factors in some illnesses but are beyond the thinking of a 4-year-old.

Rationale 2: Preschoolers understand some concepts of being sick but not the cause of illness. They are likely to think that they are sick as a result of something that they have done. They will frequently view illness as punishment. A child of this age does not yet understand that he can become sick from exposure to someone else who is sick. The other two answers, while not causes of sore throat, can be factors in some illnesses but are beyond the thinking of a 4-year-old.

Rationale 3: Preschoolers understand some concepts of being sick but not the cause of illness. They are likely to think that they are sick as a result of something that they have done. They will frequently view illness as punishment. A child of this age does not yet understand that he can become sick from exposure to someone else who is sick. The other two answers, while not causes of sore throat, can be factors in some illnesses but are beyond the thinking of a 4-year-old.

Rationale 4: Preschoolers understand some concepts of being sick but not the cause of illness. They are likely to think that they are sick as a result of something that they have done. They will frequently view illness as punishment. A child of this age does not yet understand that he can become sick from exposure to someone else who is sick. The other two answers, while not causes of sore throat, can be factors in some illnesses but are beyond the thinking of a 4-year-old.

Global Rationale: Preschoolers understand some concepts of being sick but not the cause of illness. They are likely to think that they are sick as a result of something that they have done. They will frequently view illness as punishment. A child of this age does not yet understand that he can become sick from exposure to someone else who is sick. The other two answers, while not causes of sore throat, can be factors in some illnesses but are beyond the thinking of a 4-year-old.

Cognitive Level: Analyzing

Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity

Client Need Sub: 

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Assessment

Learning Outcome: LO 11.1 Compare and contrast the childs understanding of health and illness according to the childs developmental level.

Question 5

Type: MCSA

The charge nurse is concerned with reducing the stressors of hospitalization. Which nursing intervention is most helpful in decreasing the stressors for the toddler-age client?

1. Assign the same nurse to the toddler as much as possible.

2. Let the child listen to an audiotape of the mothers voice.

3. Place a picture of the family at the bedside.

4. Encourage a parent to stay with the child.

Correct Answer: 4

Rationale 1: While all of the interventions are appropriate for the hospitalized toddler, presence of a parent is most important. Separation from parents is the major stressor for the hospitalized toddler.

Rationale 2: While all of the interventions are appropriate for the hospitalized toddler, presence of a parent is most important. Separation from parents is the major stressor for the hospitalized toddler.

Rationale 3: While all of the interventions are appropriate for the hospitalized toddler, presence of a parent is most important. Separation from parents is the major stressor for the hospitalized toddler.

Rationale 4: While all of the interventions are appropriate for the hospitalized toddler, presence of a parent is most important. Separation from parents is the major stressor for the hospitalized toddler.

Global Rationale: While all of the interventions are appropriate for the hospitalized toddler, presence of a parent is most important. Separation from parents is the major stressor for the hospitalized toddler.

Cognitive Level: Analyzing

Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity

Client Need Sub: 

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Implementation

Learning Outcome: LO 11.5 Identify nursing strategies to minimize the stressors related to hospitalization.

Question 6

Type: MCSA

The nurse is working with a school-age child who is hospitalized. Which action by the nurse will promote a sense of industry in this child?

1. Allow the child to assist with her care.

2. Encourage parents to participate in the childs care.

3. Give the child a detailed scientific explanation of the illness.

4. Speak to the child in a high-pitched voice.

Correct Answer: 1

Rationale 1: Allowing the child to participate in her care will decrease the sense of loss of control and increase a sense of industry. While parents can certainly participate in their childs care, it does not increase the childs sense of control. School-age children in general will not understand detailed scientific explanations. Change in voice tone is appropriate when talking to very young children.

Rationale 2: Allowing the child to participate in her care will decrease the sense of loss of control and increase a sense of industry. While parents can certainly participate in their childs care, it does not increase the childs sense of control. School-age children in general will not understand detailed scientific explanations. Change in voice tone is appropriate when talking to very young children.

Rationale 3: Allowing the child to participate in her care will decrease the sense of loss of control and increase a sense of industry. While parents can certainly participate in their childs care, it does not increase the childs sense of control. School-age children in general will not understand detailed scientific explanations. Change in voice tone is appropriate when talking to very young children.

Rationale 4: Allowing the child to participate in her care will decrease the sense of loss of control and increase a sense of industry. While parents can certainly participate in their childs care, it does not increase the childs sense of control. School-age children in general will not understand detailed scientific explanations. Change in voice tone is appropriate when talking to very young children.

Global Rationale: Allowing the child to participate in her care will decrease the sense of loss of control and increase a sense of industry. While parents can certainly participate in their childs care, it does not increase the childs sense of control. School-age children in general will not understand detailed scientific explanations. Change in voice tone is appropriate when talking to very young children.

Cognitive Level: Analyzing

Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity

Client Need Sub: 

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Implementation

Learning Outcome: LO 11.1 Compare and contrast the childs understanding of health and illness according to the childs developmental level.

Question 7

Type: MCSA

The nurse is caring for a client in the pediatric intensive-care unit (PICU). The parents have expressed anger over the nursing care their child is receiving. Which nursing intervention is most appropriate based on the situation?

1. Ask the physician to talk with the family.

2. Explain to the parents that their anger is affecting their child so they will not be allowed to visit the child until they calm down.

3. Acknowledge the parents concerns and collaborate with them regarding the care of their child.

4. Call the chaplain to sit with the family.

Correct Answer: 3

Rationale 1: Hospitalization of the child in a pediatric intensive-care unit is a great stressor for parents. If the parents feel that they are not informed or involved in the care of their child, they may become angry and upset. Calling the physician or chaplain may be appropriate at some point, but the nurse must assume the role of supporter in this situation to promote a sense of trust. Telling the parents that they cannot visit their child will only increase their anger.

Rationale 2: Hospitalization of the child in a pediatric intensive-care unit is a great stressor for parents. If the parents feel that they are not informed or involved in the care of their child, they may become angry and upset. Calling the physician or chaplain may be appropriate at some point, but the nurse must assume the role of supporter in this situation to promote a sense of trust. Telling the parents that they cannot visit their child will only increase their anger.

Rationale 3: Hospitalization of the child in a pediatric intensive-care unit is a great stressor for parents. If the parents feel that they are not informed or involved in the care of their child, they may become angry and upset. Calling the physician or chaplain may be appropriate at some point, but the nurse must assume the role of supporter in this situation to promote a sense of trust. Telling the parents that they cannot visit their child will only increase their anger.

Rationale 4: Hospitalization of the child in a pediatric intensive-care unit is a great stressor for parents. If the parents feel that they are not informed or involved in the care of their child, they may become angry and upset. Calling the physician or chaplain may be appropriate at some point, but the nurse must assume the role of supporter in this situation to promote a sense of trust. Telling the parents that they cannot visit their child will only increase their anger.

Global Rationale: Hospitalization of the child in a pediatric intensive-care unit is a great stressor for parents. If the parents feel that they are not informed or involved in the care of their child, they may become angry and upset. Calling the physician or chaplain may be appropriate at some point, but the nurse must assume the role of supporter in this situation to promote a sense of trust. Telling the parents that they cannot visit their child will only increase their anger.

Cognitive Level: Analyzing

Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity

Client Need Sub: 

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Implementation

Learning Outcome: LO 11.2 Explain the effect of hospitalization on the child and family.

Question 8

Type: MCSA

A toddler recently diagnosed with a seizure disorder will be discharged home on an anticonvulsant. Which action by the mother best demonstrates understanding of how to give the medication?

1. Verbalizing how to give the medication

2. Acknowledging understanding of written instructions

3. Drawing up the medication correctly in an oral syringe and administering it to the child

4. Observing the nurse draw up the medication and administering it to the child.

Correct Answer: 3

Rationale 1: Verbalization of how to give the medication and acknowledging understanding of written instructions are methods that might be used, but they do not actually demonstrate understanding. Observing the nurse draw up and administer the medication may be used in the teaching process. The best way for the mother to demonstrate understanding is to actually draw up and give the medication.

Rationale 2: Verbalization of how to give the medication and acknowledging understanding of written instructions are methods that might be used, but they do not actually demonstrate understanding. Observing the nurse draw up and administer the medication may be used in the teaching process. The best way for the mother to demonstrate understanding is to actually draw up and give the medication.

Rationale 3: Verbalization of how to give the medication and acknowledging understanding of written instructions are methods that might be used, but they do not actually demonstrate understanding. Observing the nurse draw up and administer the medication may be used in the teaching process. The best way for the mother to demonstrate understanding is to actually draw up and give the medication.

Rationale 4: Verbalization of how to give the medication and acknowledging understanding of written instructions are methods that might be used, but they do not actually demonstrate understanding. Observing the nurse draw up and administer the medication may be used in the teaching process. The best way for the mother to demonstrate understanding is to actually draw up and give the medication.

Global Rationale: Verbalization of how to give the medication and acknowledging understanding of written instructions are methods that might be used, but they do not actually demonstrate understanding. Observing the nurse draw up and administer the medication may be used in the teaching process. The best way for the mother to demonstrate understanding is to actually draw up and give the medication.

Cognitive Level: Applying

Client Need: Safe Effective Care Environment

Client Need Sub: 

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Evaluation

Learning Outcome: LO 11.7 Summarize strategies for preparing children and families for discharge from the hospital setting.

Question 9

Type: MCSA

The nurse must perform a procedure on a toddler. Which technique is the most appropriate when performing the procedure?

1. Ask the mother to restrain the child during the procedure.

2. Ask the child if it is okay to start the procedure.

3. Perform the procedure in the childs hospital bed.

4. Allow the child to cry or scream.

Correct Answer: 4

Rationale 1: While the toddler will need to be restrained, the parent should not be the one to do this. The nurse should avoid giving the child a choice if there is no choice. The treatment room should be utilized for the procedure so that the hospital bed remains a safe place. The child should be allowed to cry or scream during the procedure.

Rationale 2: While the toddler will need to be restrained, the parent should not be the one to do this. The nurse should avoid giving the child a choice if there is no choice. The treatment room should be utilized for the procedure so that the hospital bed remains a safe place. The child should be allowed to cry or scream during the procedure.

Rationale 3: While the toddler will need to be restrained, the parent should not be the one to do this. The nurse should avoid giving the child a choice if there is no choice. The treatment room should be utilized for the procedure so that the hospital bed remains a safe place. The child should be allowed to cry or scream during the procedure.

Rationale 4: While the toddler will need to be restrained, the parent should not be the one to do this. The nurse should avoid giving the child a choice if there is no choice. The treatment room should be utilized for the procedure so that the hospital bed remains a safe place. The child should be allowed to cry or scream during the procedure.

Global Rationale: While the toddler will need to be restrained, the parent should not be the one to do this. The nurse should avoid giving the child a choice if there is no choice. The treatment room should be utilized for the procedure so that the hospital bed remains a safe place. The child should be allowed to cry or scream during the procedure.

Cognitive Level: Applying

Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity

Client Need Sub: 

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Planning

Learning Outcome: LO 11.5 Identify nursing strategies to minimize the stressors related to hospitalization.

Question 10

Type: MCSA

A young school-age client is in the playroom when the respiratory therapist arrives on the pediatric unit to give the child a scheduled breathing treatment. Which action by the nurse is the most appropriate?

1. Reschedule the treatment for a later time.

2. Show the respiratory therapist to the playroom so the treatment may be performed.

3. Escort the child to his room and ask the child-life specialist to bring toys to the bedside.

4. Assist the child back to his room for the treatment but reassure the child that he may return when the procedure is completed.

Correct Answer: 4

Rationale 1: Procedures should not be performed in the playroom. Scheduled respiratory treatments should be performed on time; however, the child should be allowed to return to the playroom as soon as the procedure is completed.

Rationale 2: Procedures should not be performed in the playroom. Scheduled respiratory treatments should be performed on time; however, the child should be allowed to return to the playroom as soon as the procedure is completed.

Rationale 3: Procedures should not be performed in the playroom. Scheduled respiratory treatments should be performed on time; however, the child should be allowed to return to the playroom as soon as the procedure is completed.

Rationale 4: Procedures should not be performed in the playroom. Scheduled respiratory treatments should be performed on time; however, the child should be allowed to return to the playroom as soon as the procedure is completed.

Global Rationale: Procedures should not be performed in the playroom. Scheduled respiratory treatments should be performed on time; however, the child should be allowed to return to the playroom as soon as the procedure is completed.

Cognitive Level: Applying

Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity

Client Need Sub: 

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Implementation

Learning Outcome: LO 11.5 Identify nursing strategies to minimize the stressors related to hospitalization.

Question 11

Type: MCSA

The nurse is working with a hospitalized preschool-age child. The nurse is planning activities to reduce anxiety in this child. Which action by the nurse is the most appropriate?

1. Provide the child with a doll and safe medical equipment.

2. Read a story to the child.

3. Use an anatomically correct doll to teach the child about the illness.

4. Talk to the child about the hospitalization.

Correct Answer: 1

Rationale 1: Therapeutic play is a means of anxiety reduction in the hospitalized child. Allowing the child to play with safe medical equipment is an age-appropriate method through which the child can express her feelings, thereby reducing anxiety. Anatomically correct dolls are not age appropriate. Reading a story to the child does not allow for expression of feelings. Talking to the child may be beneficial, but it does not allow for active release of frustration and anxiety as active play does.

Rationale 2: Therapeutic play is a means of anxiety reduction in the hospitalized child. Allowing the child to play with safe medical equipment is an age-appropriate method through which the child can express her feelings, thereby reducing anxiety. Anatomically correct dolls are not age appropriate. Reading a story to the child does not allow for expression of feelings. Talking to the child may be beneficial, but it does not allow for active release of frustration and anxiety as active play does.

Rationale 3: Therapeutic play is a means of anxiety reduction in the hospitalized child. Allowing the child to play with safe medical equipment is an age-appropriate method through which the child can express her feelings, thereby reducing anxiety. Anatomically correct dolls are not age appropriate. Reading a story to the child does not allow for expression of feelings. Talking to the child may be beneficial, but it does not allow for active release of frustration and anxiety as active play does.

Rationale 4: Therapeutic play is a means of anxiety reduction in the hospitalized child. Allowing the child to play with safe medical equipment is an age-appropriate method through which the child can express her feelings, thereby reducing anxiety. Anatomically correct dolls are not age appropriate. Reading a story to the child does not allow for expression of feelings. Talking to the child may be beneficial, but it does not allow for active release of frustration and anxiety as active play does.

Global Rationale: Therapeutic play is a means of anxiety reduction in the hospitalized child. Allowing the child to play with safe medical equipment is an age-appropriate method through which the child can express her feelings, thereby reducing anxiety. Anatomically correct dolls are not age appropriate. Reading a story to the child does not allow for expression of feelings. Talking to the child may be beneficial, but it does not allow for active release of frustration and anxiety as active play does.

Cognitive Level: Applying

Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity

Client Need Sub: 

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Implementation

Learning Outcome: LO 11.5 Identify nursing strategies to minimize the stressors related to hospitalization.

Question 12

Type: MCSA

The nurse needs to administer a medication to a preschool-age child. The medication is only available in tablet form. Which action by the nurse is the most appropriate?

1. Place the tablet on the childs tongue and give the child a drink of water.

2. Break the tablet in small pieces and ask the child to swallow the pieces one by one.

3. Crush the tablet and mix it in a teaspoon of applesauce.

4. Crush the table and mix it in a cup of juice.

Correct Answer: 3

Rationale 1: A 4-year-old is not mature enough to swallow a pill or pieces of a pill. The medication should be crushed and mixed with a very small amount of food, not juice.

Rationale 2: A 4-year-old is not mature enough to swallow a pill or pieces of a pill. The medication should be crushed and mixed with a very small amount of food, not juice.

Rationale 3: A 4-year-old is not mature enough to swallow a pill or pieces of a pill. The medication should be crushed and mixed with a very small amount of food, not juice.

Rationale 4: A 4-year-old is not mature enough to swallow a pill or pieces of a pill. The medication should be crushed and mixed with a very small amount of food, not juice.

Global Rationale: A 4-year-old is not mature enough to swallow a pill or pieces of a pill. The medication should be crushed and mixed with a very small amount of food, not juice.

Cognitive Level: Analyzing

Client Need: Physiological Integrity

Client Need Sub: 

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Implementation

Learning Outcome: LO 11.2 Explain the effect of hospitalization on the child and family.

Question 13

Type: MCSA

A child is being discharged from the hospital after a 3-week stay following a motor vehicle accident. The mother expresses concern about caring for the childs wounds at home. She has demonstrated appropriate technique with medication administration and wound care. Which nursing diagnosis is the priority in this situation?

1. Knowledge Deficit of Home Care

2. Altered Family Processes Related to Hospitalization

3. Parental Anxiety Related to Care of the Child at Home

4. Risk for Infection Related to Presence of Healing Wounds

Correct Answer: 3

Rationale 1: While all of the diagnoses might have been appropriate at some point, the current focus is the mothers anxiety about caring for the child at home. The priority of the nurse is relieving this anxiety.

Rationale 2: While all of the diagnoses might have been appropriate at some point, the current focus is the mothers anxiety about caring for the child at home. The priority of the nurse is relieving this anxiety.

Rationale 3: While all of the diagnoses might have been appropriate at some point, the current focus is the mothers anxiety about caring for the child at home. The priority of the nurse is relieving this anxiety.

Rationale 4: While all of the diagnoses might have been appropriate at some point, the current focus is the mothers anxiety about caring for the child at home. The priority of the nurse is relieving this anxiety.

Global Rationale: While all of the diagnoses might have been appropriate at some point, the current focus is the mothers anxiety about caring for the child at home. The priority of the nurse is relieving this anxiety.

Cognitive Level: Analyzing

Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity

Client Need Sub: 

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Diagnosis

Learning Outcome: LO 11.7 Summarize strategies for preparing children and families for discharge from the hospital setting.

Question 14

Type: MCSA

An infant has been NPO for surgery for 4 hours and does not have an intravenous line. The nurse receives a call from the operating room with the information that the surgery has been postponed due to an emergency. Which action by the nurse is the most appropriate?

1. Feed the infant 4 ounces of formula.

2. Reassure the parents that it will not be much longer before surgery.

3. Allow the parents to feed the infant an ounce of oral rehydration solution.

4. Call the physician to see if the infant needs to have an intravenous line started.

Correct Answer: 4

Rationale 1: The infant who is NPO is at high risk for dehydration. The nurse does not know how much longer it will be before surgery. The nurse cannot independently make the decision to feed the infant. Feeding the infant could further postpone the surgery, should an operating room become available sooner than expected. It is best to keep the infant NPO and consult the physician to see if an intravenous line is needed.

Rationale 2: The infant who is NPO is at high risk for dehydration. The nurse does not know how much longer it will be before surgery. The nurse cannot independently make the decision to feed the infant. Feeding the infant could further postpone the surgery, should an operating room become available sooner than expected. It is best to keep the infant NPO and consult the physician to see if an intravenous line is needed.

Rationale 3: The infant who is NPO is at high risk for dehydration. The nurse does not know how much longer it will be before surgery. The nurse cannot independently make the decision to feed the infant. Feeding the infant could further postpone the surgery, should an operating room become available sooner than expected. It is best to keep the infant NPO and consult the physician to see if an intravenous line is needed.

Rationale 4: The infant who is NPO is at high risk for dehydration. The nurse does not know how much longer it will be before surgery. The nurse cannot independently make the decision to feed the infant. Feeding the infant could further postpone the surgery, should an operating room become available sooner than expected. It is best to keep the infant NPO and consult the physician to see if an intravenous line is needed.

Global Rationale: The infant who is NPO is at high risk for dehydration. The nurse does not know how much longer it will be before surgery. The nurse cannot independently make the decision to feed the infant. Feeding the infant could further postpone the surgery, should an operating room become available sooner than expected. It is best to keep the infant NPO and consult the physician to see if an intravenous line is needed.

Cognitive Level: Analyzing

Client Need: Physiological Integrity

Client Need Sub: 

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Assessment

Learning Outcome: LO 11.2 Explain the effect of hospitalization on the child and family.

Question 15

Type: MCSA

The nurse is working with an adolescent client who will be admitted to the hospital in two days. Which nursing approach is most appropriate to prepare this client for hospitalization?

1. Have teens who have had similar experiences talk to the adolescent about hospitalization.

2. Provide an opportunity for the child to talk with an adult who has had a similar experience.

3. Teach parents what to expect so the information can be shared with the adolescent.

4. Provide an opportunity for the teen to try on surgical attire.

Correct Answer: 1

Rationale 1: Adolescents benefit from a different approach than younger children when being prepared for hospitalization. Written materials, anatomically correct dolls, and talking to peers who have had similar experiences are all appropriate for the adolescent. The adolescent should be taught first-hand what to expect during the hospitalization. Dressing up in surgical attire is appropriate for the younger child.

Rationale 2: Adolescents benefit from a different approach than younger children when being prepared for hospitalization. Written materials, anatomically correct dolls, and talking to peers who have had similar experiences are all appropriate for the adolescent. The adolescent should be taught first-hand what to expect during the hospitalization. Dressing up in surgical attire is appropriate for the younger child.

Rationale 3: Adolescents benefit from a different approach than younger children when being prepared for hospitalization. Written materials, anatomically correct dolls, and talking to peers who have had similar experiences are all appropriate for the adolescent. The adolescent should be taught first-hand what to expect during the hospitalization. Dressing up in surgical attire is appropriate for the younger child.

Rationale 4: Adolescents benefit from a different approach than younger children when being prepared for hospitalization. Written materials, anatomically correct dolls, and talking to peers who have had similar experiences are all appropriate for the adolescent. The adolescent should be taught first-hand what to expect during the hospitalization. Dressing up in surgical attire is appropriate for the younger child.

Global Rationale: Adolescents benefit from a different approach than younger children when being prepared for hospitalization. Written materials, anatomically correct dolls, and talking to peers who have had similar experiences are all appropriate for the adolescent. The adolescent should be taught first-hand what to expect during the hospitalization. Dressing up in surgical attire is appropriate for the younger child.

Cognitive Level: Applying

Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity

Client Need Sub: 

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Planning

Learning Outcome: LO 11.5 Identify nursing strategies to minimize the stressors related to hospitalization.

Question 16

Type: MCMA

The nurse is providing care to a school-age client who is admitted to the hospital after a motor vehicle accident.  Which interventions are appropriate to prepare this client and family for their hospital stay?

Standard Text: Select all that apply.

1. A hospital tour

2. A health fair brochure

3. An orientation to the unit

4. An age-appropriate explanation of procedures

5. A child life program consultation

Correct Answer: 3,4,5

Rationale 1: Interventions that are appropriate for this client and family are those that occur as the result of an unplanned hospital admission. The nurse would orient the client and family to the unit and provide age-appropriate explanation for all procedures. It is also appropriate for the nurse to consult with the child life program. A hospital tour and a health fair brochure are appropriate interventions for a planned hospitalization.

Rationale 2: Interventions that are appropriate for this client and family are those that occur as the result of an unplanned hospital admission. The nurse would orient the client and family to the unit and provide age-appropriate explanation for all procedures. It is also appropriate for the nurse to consult with the child life program. A hospital tour and a health fair brochure are appropriate interventions for a planned hospitalization.

Rationale 3: Interventions that are appropriate for this client and family are those that occur as the result of an unplanned hospital admission. The nurse would orient the client and family to the unit and provide age-appropriate explanation for all procedures. It is also appropriate for the nurse to consult with the child life program. A hospital tour and a health fair brochure are appropriate interventions for a planned hospitalization.

Rationale 4: Interventions that are appropriate for this client and family are those that occur as the result of an unplanned hospital admission. The nurse would orient the client and family to the unit and provide age-appropriate explanation for all procedures. It is also appropriate for the nurse to consult with the child life program. A hospital tour and a health fair brochure are appropriate interventions for a planned hospitalization.

Rationale 5: Interventions that are appropriate for this client and family are those that occur as the result of an unplanned hospital admission. The nurse would orient the client and family to the unit and provide age-appropriate explanation for all procedures. It is also appropriate for the nurse to consult with the child life program. A hospital tour and a health fair brochure are appropriate interventions for a planned hospitalization.

Global Rationale: Interventions that are appropriate for this client and family are those that occur as the result of an unplanned hospital admission. The nurse would orient the client and family to the unit and provide age-appropriate explanation for all procedures. It is also appropriate for the nurse to consult with the child life program. A hospital tour and a health fair brochure are appropriate interventions for a planned hospitalization.

Cognitive Level: Applying

Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity

Client Need Sub: 

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Implementation

Learning Outcome: LO 11.3 Describe the childs and familys adaptation to hospitalization.

Question 17

Type: MCMA

The nurse is providing care to a preschool-age client who was admitted to the medicalsurgical unit after an acute asthma attack. Which interventions foster a family-centered focus to client care?

Standard Text: Select all that apply.

1. Discussing rooming in with the parents of the client

2. Allowing the client to cry it out after the parents leave for the evening

3. Providing comfort items from home, such as a blanket

4. Maintaining strict visitation for the family

5. Discussing what to expect during the hospital stay

Correct Answer: 1,3,5

Rationale 1: Family-centered care principles that are used in the hospital setting include rooming in, providing comfort items from home, and discussing what to expect. Allowing the child to cry it out and maintaining strict visitation for the family are not family-centered principles.

Rationale 2: Family-centered care principles that are used in the hospital setting include rooming in, providing comfort items from home, and discussing what to expect. Allowing the child to cry it out and maintaining strict visitation for the family are not family-centered principles.

Rationale 3: Family-centered care principles that are used in the hospital setting include rooming in, providing comfort items from home, and discussing what to expect. Allowing the child to cry it out and maintaining strict visitation for the family are not family-centered principles.

Rationale 4: Family-centered care principles that are used in the hospital setting include rooming in, providing comfort items from home, and discussing what to expect. Allowing the child to cry it out and maintaining strict visitation for the family are not family-centered principles.

Rationale 5: Family-centered care principles that are used in the hospital setting include rooming in, providing comfort items from home, and discussing what to expect. Allowing the child to cry it out and maintaining strict visitation for the family are not family-centered principles.

Global Rationale: Family-centered care principles that are used in the hospital setting include rooming in, providing comfort items from home, and discussing what to expect. Allowing the child to cry it out and maintaining strict visitation for the family are not family-centered principles.

Cognitive Level: Applying

Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity

Client Need Sub: 

Nursing/Integrated Concepts: Nursing Process: Planning

Learning Outcome: LO 11.4 Apply family-centered care principles to the hospital setting.

Ball/Bindler/Cowen, Principles of Pediatric Nursing 6th Ed. Test Bank

Copyright 2015 by Pearson Education, Inc.

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