Chapter 04: Using Your Methods and Skills: Studying and Testing My Nursing Test Banks

Chapter 04: Using Your Methods and Skills: Studying and Testing

Test Bank

MULTIPLE CHOICE

1. A nursing student who is receiving poor grades states, I am experiencing difficulty due to lack of time to devote to school. The additional factor that should be explored is lack of

a.

aptitude.

b.

interest.

c.

motivation.

d.

study skills.

ANS: D

Lack of understanding of how to study and how to use available time to study is generally a greater problem than actual lack of time. The other options are less relevant as causes of failure to learn and retain material.

DIF: Cognitive Level: Application REF: p. 34 OBJ: 1

TOP: Lack of study skills KEY: Nursing Process Step: N/A

MSC: NCLEX: N/A

2. A nursing student is studying for an examination and becomes distracted by things needing to be done. The best intervention would be to

a.

make a list of things that need to be done and return to studying.

b.

turn on the radio in an attempt to drown out the distraction.

c.

stop studying until there are fewer distractions with which to contend.

d.

do what has to be done immediately and then return to studying.

ANS: A

Concentration can be disrupted by internal distractions. In this case, taking a short break and making a list of the things to do so they are not forgotten could be enough to allow the student to concentrate. Turning on the radio to drown out distraction would not be helpful. Stopping studying is not appropriate, because there may never be fewer distractions. Doing what has to be done immediately and then returning to studying could take too much time away from studying.

DIF: Cognitive Level: Analysis REF: p. 35 OBJ: 1

TOP: Concentration/Distractions KEY: Nursing Process Step: N/A

MSC: NCLEX: N/A

3. Which student would be classified as a passive listener?

a.

Student A, who completes a grocery list during class

b.

Student B, who asks questions about class content

c.

Student C, who puts key concepts into words during note taking

d.

Student D, who contributes to classroom discussion of the topic

ANS: A

Student A demonstrates no personal involvement in the class and thus is considered a passive participant. The students described in all of the other options demonstrate personal involvement and are considered active listeners and participants.

DIF: Cognitive Level: Analysis REF: p. 36 OBJ: 1

TOP: Active vs. passive listening KEY: Nursing Process Step: N/A

MSC: NCLEX: N/A

4. Which technique is most helpful to a student who wishes to better organize the material presented during a lecture?

a.

Note making

b.

Shorthand

c.

Tape recording

d.

Passive listening

ANS: A

Note making and condensing material require active listening and promote organization of key ideas and concepts. Using shorthand requires transcription and does not necessarily result in organized notes. Tape recording simply gives a replay of the lecture; it does not organize the information. Passive listening does not contribute to organization.

DIF: Cognitive Level: Comprehension REF: p. 36 OBJ: 1

TOP: Note making KEY: Nursing Process Step: N/A MSC: NCLEX: N/A

5. A nursing student complains about difficulty remembering information read in the text. To resolve this problem effectively, the student should address the fact that the most common reason students cannot remember information is

a.

information overload.

b.

lack of understanding of the material.

c.

new knowledge interferes with recall of old knowledge.

d.

old knowledge interferes with recall of new material.

ANS: B

Reading with comprehension is required if one is to retain the information. Information overload is a fallacy. New and old knowledge interfering with recall are not the most common reasons for not remembering.

DIF: Cognitive Level: Application REF: p. 37 OBJ: 1

TOP: Relationship of reading comprehension and remembering

KEY: Nursing Process Step: N/A MSC: NCLEX: N/A

6. The rationale for use of short, frequent study periods that focus on understanding the material is

a.

to memorize facts.

b.

to lay down a neural trace.

c.

to prevent old knowledge from interfering with recall of new knowledge.

d.

to motivate learning by developing a positive attitude toward the subject matter.

ANS: B

A neural trace is required to move information from temporary to permanent memory. Striving for understanding gives the 4 to 5 seconds necessary for the formation of the neural trace. The other options do not provide a valid rationale.

DIF: Cognitive Level: Comprehension REF: p. 38 OBJ: 1

TOP: Permanent memory requires formation of a neural trace KEY: Nursing Process Step: N/A

MSC: NCLEX: N/A

7. A struggling nursing student studies several hours daily while children watch television nearby. It is likely that this student needs to

a.

schedule another hour of nightly study.

b.

correct eyestrain by having his or her eyes tested.

c.

study where there are fewer external distractions.

d.

listen actively in class to reduce study hours.

ANS: C

When a students study habits are not working, a change is necessary. It is likely that the student is distracted by the television and the children and is unable to fully concentrate. The quality of study may be more problematic than the quantity. The scenario does not suggest eyestrain. Active listening is important but may not be sufficient to reduce study hours.

DIF: Cognitive Level: Application REF: pp. 34-35 OBJ: 1

TOP: Distractions KEY: Nursing Process Step: N/A MSC: NCLEX: N/A

8. At what level of information processing must LPN/LVNs function in order to pass the NCLEX-PN examination and meet employer expectations?

a.

Knowing and being able to repeat facts

b.

Understanding the meaning of material and being able to apply it in new situations

c.

Grasping information and being able to analyze advanced concepts

d.

Questioning the validity of all information and being able to synthesize material

ANS: B

The level of information processing necessary for licensure and meeting employer expectations is best described as understanding the meaning of material, storing it in long-term memory, and being able to apply it clinically. Knowing and being able to repeat facts is insufficient. Grasping information and being able to analyze advanced concepts and questioning the validity of all information and being able to synthesize material are beyond realistic expectations for practical/vocational nursing.

DIF: Cognitive Level: Knowledge REF: p. 39 OBJ: 1

TOP: LPN/LVN level of understanding theory KEY: Nursing Process Step: N/A

MSC: NCLEX: N/A

9. A nursing student is discouraged and states, Ill never be good at studying! The most helpful remark another student could make would be

a.

For most students, study skills develop with organization, practice, and hard work.

b.

For most students, study skills that were successful in high school are useful in nursing school.

c.

For most students, study skills arent really necessary if you listen carefully in class.

d.

For most students, study skills depend on motivation to arrange adequate time to devote to learning.

ANS: A

Organization, practice, and hard work are the qualities that lead to the acquisition of study skills.

DIF: Cognitive Level: Application REF: p. 34 OBJ: 1

TOP: Study skill development KEY: Nursing Process Step: N/A

MSC: NCLEX: N/A

10. A nursing student has difficulty concentrating while studying and is easily distracted by external activity. Daydreaming is triggered by relaxation and music. The best physical environment for studying would be sitting

a.

on a bed with the feet up and the back against a pillow.

b.

in a reclining chair facing a television with the volume turned on low.

c.

at the kitchen table during meal preparation or clean-up time.

d.

at a desk in a quiet room.

ANS: D

The scenario describes a student who is negatively affected by environmental distractions. Sitting at a desk in a quiet room is the best environment for one who is easily distracted by environmental events, because it limits environmental stimuli. Sitting on a bed with the feet up and the back against a pillow would promote relaxation (sleep) and daydreaming. Sitting in a reclining chair with the television on or at the kitchen table during meal preparation or clean-up places the student in the midst of considerable environmental stimulation.

DIF: Cognitive Level: Analysis REF: pp. 34-35 OBJ: 1

TOP: External Distractions KEY: Nursing Process Step: N/A

MSC: NCLEX: N/A

11. A struggling nursing student reports studying best in an environment with some background sound. The student should first consider

a.

studying with a peer group.

b.

re-evaluating the study environment.

c.

hiring a tutor.

d.

cramming for examinations.

ANS: B

When a learning style preference is not producing results, one should consider change. Thinking that one can study in the presence of noise and other distractions is a common fallacy. The student should try studying in a quiet place. Joining a study group should not be the first consideration. Tutoring may not be necessary; it should not be the first consideration. Cramming is never advocated as a helpful method for improving grades.

DIF: Cognitive Level: Analysis REF: pp. 34-35 OBJ: 1

TOP: Study environment KEY: Nursing Process Step: N/A

MSC: NCLEX: N/A

12. A nursing student researched a topic for a class presentation online and explored several sites, using up most of the evenings study time. The next time there is an Internet assignment, a helpful strategy would be to

a.

set a kitchen timer for 30 minutes.

b.

do the assignment only after doing all other study tasks.

c.

forget to do the assignment.

d.

ask a friend to do the assignment.

ANS: A

Creating a situation in which the student is reminded of elapsed time should limit the time spent on the Internet yet permit the student to complete the assignment independently.

DIF: Cognitive Level: Application REF: p. 35 OBJ: 1

TOP: External Distractions KEY: Nursing Process Step: N/A

MSC: NCLEX: N/A

13. A nursing student states, I have trouble writing what the instructor says in class. The most helpful hint to give the student would be

a.

Try to write the lecturers statements word for word.

b.

Write the main ideas in condensed form.

c.

Take notes in shorthand and transcribe them.

d.

Underline in the textbook what the lecturer is saying.

ANS: B

This technique is called note making. It is the most effective of the options listed relating to notes.

DIF: Cognitive Level: Analysis REF: p. 36 OBJ: 1

TOP: Note making KEY: Nursing Process Step: N/A MSC: NCLEX: N/A

14. A nursing student asks, Are there any techniques to help me better understand difficult nursing concepts? The best reply would be

a.

Memorize as much as you possibly can.

b.

Begin by learning the definition of all terms.

c.

Repeat key ideas in your own terms.

d.

Cram for examinations.

ANS: C

Repeating key ideas in ones own words fosters understanding. Understanding is required for laying down neural traces and long-term memory storage. Memorizing is only marginally effective. Learning the definition of all terms may be an excessively large order. Cramming is never advisable.

DIF: Cognitive Level: Analysis REF: p. 38 OBJ: 1

TOP: Understanding key concepts KEY: Nursing Process Step: N/A

MSC: NCLEX: N/A

15. In the PQRST method of studying, it is suggested that 50% of the students time be devoted to which two steps?

a.

Preview and read

b.

State and test

c.

Read and state

d.

Preview and question

ANS: A

Previewing gives the learner the big picture. Reading provides the opportunity to gather information to be stored in memory. The other 50% of the study time should be devoted to question, state, and test.

DIF: Cognitive Level: Knowledge REF: p. 38 OBJ: 1

TOP: PQRST method KEY: Nursing Process Step: N/A

MSC: NCLEX: N/A

16. Which is a strategy of effective reading?

a.

Read in a monotone with no inflection.

b.

Read in phrases, a few words at a time, rather than word by word.

c.

Read at the same pace regardless of difficulty.

d.

Do not mark your book or ebook.

ANS: B

For better understanding, a reader should read as he or she speaks (i.e., in phrases). You should read as you speak, which is not in a monotone. Slowing the pace of reading as the subject matter becomes more difficult will help with comprehension, and highlighting and writing notes in the margin not only forces a learner to process what he or she is reading, but also allows the reader to go back and review key points.

DIF: Cognitive Level: Comprehension REF: pp. 37-38 OBJ: 1

TOP: Reading Effectively KEY: Nursing Process Step: N/A

MSC: NCLEX: N/A

17. A nursing student reads rapidly and comprehensively but has difficulty recalling the content of assigned chapters in the nursing textbook. Which hint would be most helpful?

a.

Read each sentence word for word.

b.

Slow your reading speed for technical material.

c.

Never move your lips while reading.

d.

Ensure that the text is not marked by underlining and margin notes.

ANS: B

Reading for understanding takes time. It is possible that in addition to reading too rapidly, the individual is omitting the preview step of the PQRST method for reading textbooks and would profit from its use. The student is also likely to profit from the steps of questioning, stating, and testing. The PQRST method requires the reader to take the time necessary to lay down neural traces, thus enhancing recall. Reading each sentence word for word is unnecessary and not effective. Never moving the lips while reading is irrelevant. Understanding and recalling may be improved by making margin notes and underlining.

DIF: Cognitive Level: Analysis REF: p. 37 OBJ: 1

TOP: Increasing recall KEY: Nursing Process Step: N/A

MSC: NCLEX: N/A

18. In what significant way does the NCLEX-PN examination differ from a paper and pencil multiple choice examination given during the program of study?

a.

The NCLEX-PN questions are more difficult.

b.

The test taker cannot guess when taking the NCLEX-PN exam.

c.

The questions on the NCLEX-PN must be answered in sequence.

d.

Only program tests contain alternate format items, such as short answer questions.

ANS: C

The NCLEX-PN computer programming does not permit skipping a question and returning to it.

DIF: Cognitive Level: Analysis REF: p. 39 OBJ: 1

TOP: NCLEX-PN KEY: Nursing Process Step: N/A MSC: NCLEX: N/A

19. A nursing student is asked to identify distractions that limit the ability to concentrate. An example of an internal distraction is

a.

mental fatigue.

b.

background noise.

c.

the physical environment.

d.

other nursing students.

ANS: A

External distractions are those that come from outside oneself, whereas internal distractions are those that come from inside oneself. Mental fatigue is an example of an internal distraction. All the other options are examples of external distractions.

DIF: Cognitive Level: Comprehension REF: p. 35 OBJ: 1

TOP: Distractions KEY: Nursing Process Step: N/A MSC: NCLEX: N/A

20. A nursing student is asked to identify distractions that limit the ability to concentrate. An example of an external distraction is

a.

anxiety.

b.

daydreaming.

c.

mental fatigue.

d.

background noise.

ANS: D

External distractions are those that come from outside oneself, whereas internal distractions are those that come from inside oneself. Background noise is an example of an external distraction. All the other options are examples of internal distractions.

DIF: Cognitive Level: Comprehension REF: p. 35 OBJ: 1

TOP: Distractions KEY: Nursing Process Step: N/A MSC: NCLEX: N/A

COMPLETION

1. A nursing student spends lecture time doodling and staring out the window while thinking about what to cook for dinner. This student can best be described as a/an ____________________ listener.

ANS:

passive

The passive listener receives sounds with little recognition or personal involvement. This listener may be doodling, staring out the window, or even staring at the instructor but thinking about having to change the oil in the car or deciding what to cook for dinner.

DIF: Cognitive Level: Comprehension REF: p. 36 OBJ: 1

TOP: Listening KEY: Nursing Process Step: N/A MSC: NCLEX: N/A

2. A nursing student listens with full attention during lectures, is open-minded and curious, and asks questions about the content. This student can best be described as a/an ____________________ listener.

ANS:

active

The active listener is always thinking, not just hearing the words. Active listeners listen with full attention, are open-minded and curious, and are always asking themselves questions about the content.

DIF: Cognitive Level: Comprehension REF: p. 36 OBJ: 1

TOP: Listening KEY: Nursing Process Step: N/A MSC: NCLEX: N/A

MULTIPLE RESPONSE

1. A nursing student tells a peer, After working nights, I have a problem staying focused during the afternoon lectures. My mind wanders, and all of a sudden I realize that Im lost. What helpful hints should the peer offer? (Select all that apply.)

a.

If possible, sleep before coming to class.

b.

Complete readings after attending lecture.

c.

Write down key concepts and examples.

d.

Ask questions during and after class.

e.

Try to write everything the lecturer says.

ANS: A, C, D

Being rested can improve concentration. Completing readings before the lecture increases comprehension of the lecture material. Note making is more effective than note taking. Active involvement improves concentration.

DIF: Cognitive Level: Analysis REF: p. 36, Box 4-1

OBJ: 1 TOP: Active listening KEY: Nursing Process Step: N/A

MSC: NCLEX: N/A

2. Which statements are appropriate for telling a peer how to maximize learning from a textbook? (Select all that apply.)

a.

Be aware of your reading assignments that are technical or scientific in nature and vary your reading speed accordingly.

b.

Highlight unfamiliar words as you read and create index cards from them.

c.

Read the entire chapter quickly. Skim content and save details for later.

d.

Highlight key phrases or write notes in the margin.

e.

Remember to use your index and glossary to locate information quickly.

ANS: A, B, D, E

Varying your reading speed based on the difficulty of the subject matter will help with comprehension. Highlighting words that you dont understand and creating index cards from them will help master the difficult content. Reading quickly and skimming content, saving details for later, does not accurately reflect reading efficiently by underlining key phrases, making margin notes. Highlighting and making margin notes not only forces you to process information, but allows for reviewing concepts found in margin notes, chapter key ideas, and underlined sections when you review.

DIF: Cognitive Level: Application REF: pp. 37-38 OBJ: 1

TOP: Reading Effectively KEY: Nursing Process Step: N/A

MSC: NCLEX: N/A

3. A nursing student asks for suggestions for successful test preparation. Select the items that give the best advice. (Select all that apply.)

a.

Go to a movie or watch television the night before the test.

b.

Reread pertinent chapters in the textbook.

c.

Plan to study from 8 PM until 2 AM the night before the test.

d.

Focus on note summaries, margin writings, and underlined text.

e.

Clarify the examination format with the instructor.

ANS: D, E

Reviewing material identified as important is vital to success on the examination. Knowing the format for questions helps students focus on the types of answers they will need to formulate. Going to a movie or watching television the night before the test may interfere with memory during the examination. Rereading pertinent chapters in the textbook is counterproductive, because key concepts have been identified in notes, margin notes, and underlined sections. Cramming is a poor strategy, whereas getting a good nights sleep is helpful.

DIF: Cognitive Level: Analysis REF: pp. 39-40 OBJ: 2

TOP: Preparation for the test KEY: Nursing Process Step: N/A

MSC: NCLEX: N/A

4. A nursing student has difficulty taking multiple choice tests. The test is graded according to the number of right answers. Select the strategies most likely to be helpful when taking this type of test. (Select all that apply.)

a.

Leave easy questions until last.

b.

Answer all questions. Guess if necessary.

c.

Leave answers unchanged after recording them.

d.

Save time; stop reading options when the answer is found.

e.

Read options and eliminate all wrong options.

f.

Eliminate options unrelated to the subject matter.

ANS: B, E, F

With the type of scoring described, guessing is not penalized. Reading all options and eliminating obviously wrong distracters and those unrelated to the subject matter facilitate answering the question. Easy questions should be answered first. Answers may be changed if the learner is sure the revised answer is correct. All options should be read. First choice may seem correct, but sometimes a better option could be given later in the question.

DIF: Cognitive Level: Analysis REF: pp. 39-41, Box 4-3

OBJ: 2 TOP: Multiple choice examinations KEY: Nursing Process Step: N/A

MSC: NCLEX: N/A

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